or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Serving a whole roast tenderloin, slicing per order? Need professional restaraunt advice.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Serving a whole roast tenderloin, slicing per order? Need professional restaraunt advice.

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Recently, I roasted a whole beef tenderloin and served it with some mushrooms and onions to a group of friends.  It was excellent.  We sliced it up and served it all immideatley and everything was dandy.  My question is, how can I serve just a slice of a whole roasted tenderloin during service without the juices all flowing out and or overcooking it... Is there a way to keep the internal temp right without ruinging the rest of the roast?

 

I know to let the roast set for 15 minutes before slicing it to keep the juices in, I'm just afraid of letting the roast sit too long, the juices might leak out over time?  I dunno... help!

post #2 of 9

Simple answers but less simple solutions.

 

Preventing Overcooking:

- Hold the roast at the temperature you want to serve it.   

 

Preventing loss of juices:

 - only those cells that are cut / punctured will loose juices in large amounts.  The juices in meat are not able to move very easily between the different cell bundles.  For the duration of service there will be no problems.

 

Before I wear my fingers to 'nubbins typing up methods that will work - what tools do you have access to?

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #3 of 9

How thick a slice are we talking?  If they are somewhat thick you might bag and drop into a water bath to reheat.  You'll probably get better answers in the Professional section.

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post

Simple answers but less simple solutions.

 

Preventing Overcooking:

- Hold the roast at the temperature you want to serve it.   

 

Preventing loss of juices:

 - only those cells that are cut / punctured will loose juices in large amounts.  The juices in meat are not able to move very easily between the different cell bundles.  For the duration of service there will be no problems.

 

Before I wear my fingers to 'nubbins typing up methods that will work - what tools do you have access to?

Nothing fancy, propane grill, electric smoker and convection oven.  Keep in mind all of these types of dishes come out of an outdoor kitchen at my restaurant. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post

How thick a slice are we talking?  If they are somewhat thick you might bag and drop into a water bath to reheat.  You'll probably get better answers in the Professional section.

I was thinking 12oz?  Similar to the size of a filet mignon. 

 

I don't have a water bath, although I think there are some failrly simple DIY ones online to make..

 

Good idea, is there a way to relocate this thread?  Or should I just re post it?

post #5 of 9

Don't slice the meat.

 

Put a large water pan with hot water in the bottom of the electric smoker and set it to 140 or maybe a tad higher, just ensure the water doesn't get much above 130.  (air doesn't conduct heat as well)

 

Place the tenderloin on a rack above the water and hold for up to 4 hours.  (personally i'd say much longer but the food police will object)

 

Remove and slice to order - use a torch to crisp the outside after cutting by placing on an all metal cake stand then rotating the slice while torching the outside.  (makes it nice and crispy but still MR inside)

 

Plate on warm plates over mashed or whatever you are using to hold the heat as the slices will cool off fast although with a full 12oz you should have quite a bit of time to play with.  (it is on the generous side)

 

--- alternately ---

 

You can do the water bath by using the beer cooler hack and holding the large mass of water at 130f so you don't cook it past Med-Rare.   No need to vacuum pack just use good zip-top bags and squeeze all the air out.    Use the drain on the base of the cooler to remove water as it cools and add fresh hot water as required to keep the temp stable.  

 

I'd keep the roasts whole and slice as needed but with a 16oz portion there shouldn't be any problem holding individual servings, just don't let the temp creep up as the hot water transfers heat really fast and even a short spike to 140 will make medium cooked portions.  This also works to your advantage as if someone want well-done just drop it in a pot of 160f water for a minute or two and you're done.

 

With such a large volume of water a beer cooler is actually very stable if you keep the lid on it.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #6 of 9

Whole roasted tenderloins are how I grew up eating, but I don't think I would would try to serve it in a volume restaurant.  If you are buying 5-6 lb loins and doing a decent job of cleaning to a 70% yield you are only going to get 4.5 to 5.5 12 oz portions per loin, and the sizes and shapes are going to vary across the board.  With the water bath, you are going to have to take the loin out of the water and bag, cut a portion, reseal, then serve.  If you're planning on feeding sixty people across a service period, you will need 12 loins floating around.  Why not, instead, cook your loins just long enough to crust the outside, cut and finish in a smoking hot pan to order.  The flap end will be your well done; larger circumference thinner cuts off the head will be medium, and barrel cuts will be rare and medium rare.

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post

Don't slice the meat.

 

Put a large water pan with hot water in the bottom of the electric smoker and set it to 140 or maybe a tad higher, just ensure the water doesn't get much above 130.  (air doesn't conduct heat as well)

 

Place the tenderloin on a rack above the water and hold for up to 4 hours.  (personally i'd say much longer but the food police will object)

 

Remove and slice to order - use a torch to crisp the outside after cutting by placing on an all metal cake stand then rotating the slice while torching the outside.  (makes it nice and crispy but still MR inside)

 

Plate on warm plates over mashed or whatever you are using to hold the heat as the slices will cool off fast although with a full 12oz you should have quite a bit of time to play with.  (it is on the generous side)

 

--- alternately ---

 

You can do the water bath by using the beer cooler hack and holding the large mass of water at 130f so you don't cook it past Med-Rare.   No need to vacuum pack just use good zip-top bags and squeeze all the air out.    Use the drain on the base of the cooler to remove water as it cools and add fresh hot water as required to keep the temp stable.  

 

I'd keep the roasts whole and slice as needed but with a 16oz portion there shouldn't be any problem holding individual servings, just don't let the temp creep up as the hot water transfers heat really fast and even a short spike to 140 will make medium cooked portions.  This also works to your advantage as if someone want well-done just drop it in a pot of 160f water for a minute or two and you're done.

 

With such a large volume of water a beer cooler is actually very stable if you keep the lid on it.


I like the tip on utilizing the smoker... It keeps other things warm for us during the busy season (baked potatoes, roasted carrots, etc...) with out over cooking.  I think that would probably be the best way to do it, without a water bath. 

 

Like Garball said, having 3 or 4 whole tender loins floating in vacuum sealed bags doesn't seem very practical.

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by garball View Post

Whole roasted tenderloins are how I grew up eating, but I don't think I would would try to serve it in a volume restaurant.  If you are buying 5-6 lb loins and doing a decent job of cleaning to a 70% yield you are only going to get 4.5 to 5.5 12 oz portions per loin, and the sizes and shapes are going to vary across the board.  With the water bath, you are going to have to take the loin out of the water and bag, cut a portion, reseal, then serve.  If you're planning on feeding sixty people across a service period, you will need 12 loins floating around.  Why not, instead, cook your loins just long enough to crust the outside, cut and finish in a smoking hot pan to order.  The flap end will be your well done; larger circumference thinner cuts off the head will be medium, and barrel cuts will be rare and medium rare.

You loose the nice rosy-pink presentation this way but it would work just fine.  (steak rather than roast)

 

You wouldn't return any loins to the water bath, sealed or not once they are out on the counter during service getting sliced the last thing you want to do is re-introduce them to the danger zone.

Take out, slice and serve, place in steam table until the next order - lets you be sure their are more orders at the ready without slowly drying out the entire nights batch.

 

fwiw - i wouldn't vacu-seal tenderloin (or fish) it's just too tender and texture is messed up too easily.

 

There's always more than one way to get-er-done!

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #9 of 9

Not _that_ much really comes out.  It just looks like a lot.  If the meat is still moist then why worry?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Serving a whole roast tenderloin, slicing per order? Need professional restaraunt advice.