or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Healthy/Easy Chicken Pasta
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Healthy/Easy Chicken Pasta

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

So I've always been interested in cooking and casually make a few dishes that I found great recipes for. However, now I'm eating much healthier so I've been cooking my food in bulk on Sundays for the week. I need tons of ideas but one area which I have struggled in general is chicken pasta.

 

If anyone here has a simple recipe for a pasta, especially one that is going to end up having much more pasta then chicken I would really appreciate it. I skimmed the recipe forum but didnt seem much. I appreciate any input and look forward to learning more here!

post #2 of 8

I'm confused, why eat more pasta for a healthier diet instead of more vegetables? Pasta has few nutrients,

 

Here's a quick meal that you can eat over pasta if you'd like..

 

Saute onion, garlic, celery, bell pepper til soft. Add chicken breasts and when mostly cooked add a can of fire roasted tomatoes and some cayenne. Done in 10 minutes and tasty. For a creamier sauce start with a roux then add vegetables.

post #3 of 8

Cook the whole pound of pasta, shock it in cold water to chill it and then reheat the amount as needed in your sauce of choice.

post #4 of 8

how many pasta dishes require chicken?  the only one i know is chicken tetrazzini, a wonderful dish but kind of an anomaly, since it's american. 

 

There are plenty of pasta dishes that are very healthy - you should find tons of recipes here just among the ones i've posted - pasta with cauliflower, pasta with zucchine, pasta with pummarola, pasta with tuna and tomato, pasta aglio olio and tuna, pasta with broccoli, pasta alla norma (tomato, eggplant and cheese), pasta e fagioli (with beans), pasta e ceci (with chickpeas) etc etc etc.  You can use them as full meals, the protein being created by the combination of wheat and legumes, wheat and small amounts of cheese, small amounts of tuna, etc etc etc. 

Where does everyone get the idea that pasta contains meat?  Only a few pasta dishes have meat. 
 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tip. I lift a lot so I just need some protein centric meals. Since I love pasta it seemed like the best way I knew how to make a lot of protein and not have it be boring and get sick of it. I guess now that I'm becoming a better cook I can just nix the pasta, I like brown rice btter and its healthier :) I will look for healthy protein centric dishes here, but if you know of any feel free to mention them! Thanks!

post #6 of 8

Believe it or not, pasta and chick peas is full protein like any steak, as is pasta and beans, pasta and lentils, etc.  Same for brown rice and the above.  The key to non meat protein is to mix any 2 of the following in the same meal and they will form full useable protein as you digest them.  But if you eat just beans, or just pasta, the half protein each of them have will not be useable without the other ingredient eaten together:

 

  • grain (wheat (including pasta or bread) rice, barley, etc)
  • legumes (beans, lentils, chickpeas, peanuts, etc)
  • seeds (sesame, pumpkin, sunflower, etc)

and small amounts of

  • cheese
  • egg
  • milk
  • fish
  • meat

That means if you have pasta with a little parmigiano on it, you have a full protein.  If you have a bean and tuna salad, you have a full protein that is much more than the tuna you use, if you make hummus (chickpeas mashed with sesame seed paste) you have full protein, etc.  One egg gives a certain amount of protein, but an egg mixed with your pasta gives you much more full protein.  Same thing if you make a pasta dish with a very small amount of meat in the sauce you end up with much more protein than the meat or pasta separately in two different meals. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #7 of 8

You could also substitute ground chicken or ground turkey for beef.  I use these instead of beef for making meatballs for our pasta b/c beef upsets my stomach.

~MissyD

Reply

~MissyD

Reply
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

That means if you have pasta with a little parmigiano on it, you have a full protein. 

Wow siduri: I always "knew" about combining lentils with rice or beans with rice to get full proteins, but I never thought of combining pasta with parmeggiano to get full proteins. I asked my wife who was a vegetarian as she was growing up and had to do some research on her diet, and she answered that "if pasta and cheese was enough to get a full protein, I wish I had known about it - but that's surprising and sounds a little too easy". So I was going to ask you what your sources were and finally decided to do a little digging of my own. My results will probably surprise you as they surprised me and my wife: apparently the whole theory is wrong - even the original author of the theory herself said so. 

 

Here's a quote from the American Dietetic Association, who in 1971 stressed the importance of combining proteins: 

 

There was no basis for [protein combining] that I could see.... I began calling around and talking to people and asking them what the justification was for saying that you had to complement proteins, and there was none. And what I got instead was some interesting insight from people who were knowledgeable and actually felt that there was probably no need to complement proteins.

 

My source and more on this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein_combining

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Healthy/Easy Chicken Pasta