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Cutting Board Advice

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thanks to my new knife, i have pulled out our old wood cutting board from underneath the recipe books and begun oiling it.  As we have had it for some 10-12 years, it has been neglected in the oiling.  The board is 15x15x2.5, edge grain, but I have no idea of the wood (guessing maple as one of the sides looks like some of the flame maple guitars I have seen).  About 4-5 of the wood joints on the edge have some gapping.  Will oiling cause the wood to expand back?  If it doesn't expand back, is there some kind of filler I can use?   I will try and post pictures when I get home for lunch.

Thanks

Clint

post #2 of 23

I would not use a board that has the glue lines separated  Too much chance of bacteria growing in the gaps.  Likewise, there is not much chance of pulling the boards together and it staying.  The boards are warped.

 

The two ways to repair would be to attempt to pull it back together and reglue, or slice the affected joints on a table saw to straighten.  But if you have the skills to do either, you have the skills to make a new one. 

 

Any filler you would use would need to have a clean surface for adherence.  Back to the table saw.

 

My opinion and I am sure you will get differing opinions

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 

pics

edge separation

 

slight separation on one side, lower middle, definitely in the cutting zone

 

edge separation

 

love the end of this board (c:

post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 

pics up shortly, awaiting Mod approval

post #5 of 23

You can fill the cracks with gap filling super glue available at good hardware stores as well as stores like Home depot or lowes.  First wash board with soap and water and let it dry then rinse the gaps with alcohol, available wherever you buy the epoxy, let that dry for a few minutes then apply the super glue to the joints. It may take a couple of applications.  then sand off excess glue and re-oil the board.  

post #6 of 23

Ooooh - super glue on something you cut food on?  isn't that toxic - heavily toxic?  you'll cut little chips of it into your food. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

Ooooh - super glue on something you cut food on?  isn't that toxic - heavily toxic?  you'll cut little chips of it into your food. 

 

Considering they glue peoples faces back together with it - I seriously doubt it is toxic.  Not that I would want to eat it but I don't think it would be the end of the world.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #8 of 23

Interesting, but i tried a search on google, and couldn't find anything but conjecture.  I suppose i could have looked on google scholar, but don't really feel like researching that deeply.   I know it was used on wounds, though apparently not this variety (the kind you buy in the hardware store).  I wouldn;t use it on a cutting board. 

 

My own cutting board was put (aargh) in the dishwasher (aargh) (not by me) and started to warp a little as it was drying so i just clamped the two sides with a very strong clamp and left it several days while it dried.  seems ok.   

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #9 of 23

please dont use that board. There is so much of a chance to pick up bacteria from the open spaces. I do understand about saving the nice wooden board. But ask yourself ONE question. Is it worth the risk of maybe contaminating your food & the health of your loved ones? They may become really sick at some point in time, that includes your self. That's another reason why I got rid of all 3 plastic cutting boards, now I have two new Teak wood cutting boards that I purchased at Kohl's Store, They arent that much. And to also to protect my grandkids when they come to bake & cook with nana. Just sayin Awarsoca! Think about it... <3

post #10 of 23

On top of the potential for bacteria, etc, I kinda think that the time component isn't worth it.

 

You can go into TJ Maxx or whatever it's called down there (it's HomeSense up here for inexpensive housewares) or Ikea or anywhere, really, and get a decent cutting board for $25. 

 

http://www.ikea.com/ca/en/catalog/products/40082918/

 

Time is worth something. 

post #11 of 23

Super glue when dry is inert plastic that is fine for food contact.  The board was made with some kind of glue in the first place.  I agree it wood be easier to replace the board I just purchased 2 bamboo boards at Walmart for less than twelve bucks total.  I just suggested the repair if the board had some sentimental value.  By the by I think that board is made of cherry it is way to red for maple.

post #12 of 23

Another interesting thing about wood cutting boards is that they are naturally antibacterial.  Even so I wood be leery of using one with open cracks.

post #13 of 23

I do know how to spell would but for some reason misspelled it twice I guess I had wood on my mind.

post #14 of 23

wood glue. if it's just to fill in the spaces. =D

post #15 of 23

Glue, Wood glue, cooking glue. A manufacture of all wooden or other wise food products are done professionally by a manufacture is created with standard codes. Once it is disrupted from the original source, would be taking a great risk especially with ones self, family & friends when your preparing food for entertaining..

I am ALL FOR repairing broken items at home. however, when it comes to food its another thing. We all know in this 20th century with all the flu's & bacteria & other means (ie) chicken, can cause bad results in a person's health. Well, i've shared my feelings, so you will need to decide, Good Luck!!

post #16 of 23

Just to toss in another 2 cents worth (mostly because I'm board [pun intended] and can't keep my mouth, well fingers, shut); Consumer grade cyanoacrylate (supper glue), is chemically the same as medical grade cyanoacrylate. The medical grade is sterile. In addition to sealing open wounds it's used in dentistry so I'd not be at all concerned about it on a cutting serface.  The toxicity is pretty much limited to the fumes. That being said, yes it would be a utilitarian solution (though I think epoxy would be a better gap filler) the problem with using either to fill gaps is that neither will absorb oil so when you oil the board the wood will darken but the glue won't and you will have unsightly stripes where the gaps were.  If you can clamp it up to seal the gaps then you can probably keep the esthetics of the board. Lacking that the best solution offered is to re-saw the joints and glue it back together.  I'd use biscuit joints too just to prevent it from happening again.

 

If it were MY board, and it had sentimental value, I'd just leave the cracks and hang it on the wall for esthetics then buy myself a good end-grain cutting board for prepping.

post #17 of 23

I have a nice board that i use for cutting bread when i have a dinner and serve my homemade bread.  I cut it at the table.  I also use it for quick breads like banana bread, nut bread served with cheese, etc.  I have several plastic cutting boards for everyday cutting and chopping (chickens, onions, all that stuff), since i dislike washing dishes and prefer to put my cutting "boards" in the dishwasher.  For cutting something dry, i wouldn't be worried about the bacteria in the cracks of a wood board.   

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #18 of 23

you can also fill the spaces in with bee's wax. food safe and non toxic.

 

but then it won't glue the spaces together. just cover them up.

post #19 of 23

bc,  I agree with your post and was inclined to mention epoxy first but opted to simplify the repair, I use gap filling super glue alot for repair. 
 

post #20 of 23

Hi Davehriver,  Yes the gap filling supper glue does a good job and it sets quickly not to mention a lot easier than epoxy and bar clamps. 

post #21 of 23

What has happened to the board in the photos is the glue has dried out and given up its adherence and the wood has warped.  As stated above, the only real cure will be to either break the joints or saw them, joint all the edges and then glue again with a better quality glue.  It would be easier to buy a new board or make a new board.  Gluing again with clamp pressure or trying to fill the gaps with glue or other fillers will be futile.

 

Glue of any type will not stick permanently to other glues, finishes or oil covered surfaces.  The glue joints shown above have glue on them and will most likely have mineral oil and cooking oils/fats in them which makes the glue useless.  And since the wood has started to warp slightly, even after re-gluing and clamp pressure, the wood will return to its present state and start the process all over again.

David The BoardSMITH
www.TheBoardSMITH.com
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David The BoardSMITH
www.TheBoardSMITH.com
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post #22 of 23

Nice looking board but I too "wood" be weary what I prep on it. Definitely not a meat product. Breads and the like... sure. I always preferred the end-grain types for meats.

post #23 of 23

section on FDA approved glues here
www.gluehow.com/recommendation/Wood/to/Wood

I've used the Titebond one to fill tiny gaps and sanded it down - did the job perfectly

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