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Brownies' method?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I have been "studying" baking at home (you know, surfing the net and reading books) I noticed that baking falls under categories: foaming, sponge, creaming, pie(where everything must be cold), muffin method and straight dough method.

However I noticed that fudgy-heavy cakes such as brownies, blondies and others similart do not fall under any of those categories. They are basically melted butter and other ingredients with minimal dry ingredients. Am I missing something another method? I know I don;t need to be this technical and theoritical but it helps me map recipes in my head. Thanks

post #2 of 7

I don't know that I would head my brain's filing cabinet as "baking" as there are lots of categories that fall out of your first three examples that are cake techniques.

Pastry (a stiff dough based on flour and fat) has short crust, pate choux, puff, filo, flaky and they are all baked as well.

Quick bread (leavened with something besides yeast) would include muffins, biscuits, pancakes, many cakes are thrown in this category as well as cornbread and waffles) also baked.

 

I like cookies in a separate category with drop, piped, bar (which includes brownies in my "brains" filing cabinet) and icebox (more but I think you get the idea).

 

Probably left something out but don't worry someone will be along shortly with the answer they think is better, lol.

 

mimi

 

* How could I forget yeast breads!

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

I don't know that I would head my brain's filing cabinet as "baking" as there are lots of categories that fall out of your first three examples that are cake techniques.

Pastry (a stiff dough based on flour and fat) has short crust, pate choux, puff, filo, flaky and they are all baked as well.

Quick bread (leavened with something besides yeast) would include muffins, biscuits, pancakes, many cakes are thrown in this category as well as cornbread and waffles) also baked.

 

I like cookies in a separate category with drop, piped, bar (which includes brownies in my "brains" filing cabinet) and icebox (more but I think you get the idea).

 

Probably left something out but don't worry someone will be along shortly with the answer they think is better, lol.

 

mimi

 

* How could I forget yeast breads!


Thanks for your respond but I think you misunderstood my question. I was wondering what category does the brownies and similar fudgy dense heavy cakes fall under.  

post #4 of 7

You are right I didn't answer your question.

Officially, any baked good that is leavened with something other than yeast is a quick bread.

This includes cookies and brownies.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quick_bread

 

mimi


Edited by flipflopgirl - 1/31/13 at 5:42am
post #5 of 7

You are right.

I don't understand your question.

 

Bowing out.

 

mimi

post #6 of 7

According to Alton Brown, I'm Just Here for More Food, pg 188-189, brownies are a combination of the curd method and the creaming method.

 

As I interpret his comments, this means that the yolks are beaten until thick and light, similar to the first step in making a curd, then creaming the thick and light yolks with the sugar(s) before adding the wet works and then folding in the dry works.
 

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Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

According to Alton Brown, I'm Just Here for More Food, pg 188-189, brownies are a combination of the curd method and the creaming method.

 

As I interpret his comments, this means that the yolks are beaten until thick and light, similar to the first step in making a curd, then creaming the thick and light yolks with the sugar(s) before adding the wet works and then folding in the dry works.
 


Ahaaaa, I see!! God bless you thanks a lot for your answer!! It makes sense! I am very theoretical when it comes to baking and understanding it this way is very helpful!

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