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Charcoal Grilling Chicken and Using the Drippings

post #1 of 8
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I am planning to cook two whole chicken breasts tomorrow with brussel sprouts. I was thinking to season the sprouts first and then place them in a pan directly under the cooking chicken.

 

I will season the chicken and sprouts and spread them on a shallow aluminum pan. I will get the fire going by placing the charcoals on one side of the grill. Then, I will get the temperature to 350 degrees, raise the grate and place the pan with the sprouts on the opposite site of the charcoals. I will replace the grate and place the chicken directly over the sprouts.

 

The Weber grate has on opposite sides a way to flip a portion of it to manage the charcoals under it. So, I will take advantage of this to stir the sprouts a couple of times since raising the hot grate it doesn't seem an option.

 

I would also try potatoes with the sprouts but the special diet that my wife and I are following will not allow, I think the stirring of the sprouts will be a bit challenging and I have to get the proper tool for the job.

 

What do you think? Will this work? Will the drips work on the sprouts?

 

Thanks for your time and consideration.

 

Evan

post #2 of 8

It should turn out reasonably well, I always do my chicken in the Weber with indirect heat.

 

mjb.

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post #3 of 8

Can't see why not. Only make sure drippings do not burn as they will make sprouts bitter

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post #4 of 8

Wait to start your sprouts until the chicken is dripping clear juice as the first secretions will be bloody and quite possibly contaminated.

Oh wait.

If you wait that long your chicken will be dry by the time the sprouts are done.

Why not place a pan with a bit of (low sodium) stock/or water  under the chicken, catch some of the drippings from the chicken and then cook this mix until 160 degrees.

Taste this "jus" before you use it and adjust seasonings as may be too salty (if this is the case a splash of wine or water will correct it)

Thread the veg onto skewers and use the above "mopping sauce" to baste them.

Remember that the chicken will take longer to cook so wait to start your "k-bobs".

 

mimi

post #5 of 8

Your plan is too ambitious to be convenient or fun.  Don't cook the Brussel sprouts on the lower charcoal grate.  You're setting yourself up for a lot of heartache. 

 

The lower grate in an ordinary Weber grill (as opposed to a WSM which has two cooking levels) is best reserved for fuel only. 

 

If you're going to cook sprouts on the grill, cook them, over indirect heat, on the upper grate at the same level as the chicken. 

 

Instead of using the chicken drippings, either render some bacon and toss the Brussel sprouts in the fat before putting the sprouts on their pan; or put raw bacon in the same pan and stir the sprouts occasionally as the bacon and sprouts.  Assuming you don't have problems eating pork -- bacon fat is better than chicken drippings with Brussel sprouts anyway.  So is duck or goose fat. 

 

If you absotively, posilutely must have chicken drippings, either make schmaltz ahead of time or cook the chicken first using indirect heat and a catch tray for the drippings.  I've done this several times and -- while it works -- I don't consider it worth the effort of keeping the contents of the pan from overcooking.  There's just too much manipulation of grates, too much adding splashes of water, too much on and off with the cover, too much PITA.   

 

You may want to consider par cooking the Brussel sprouts in steam; toss them with the bacon and rendered bacon fat; then cooking in the WK just until the sprouts are nice and mushy, have some color, and both the bacon and vegetable pick up a little charcoal flavor. 

 

By shortening the sprouts' cooking time, you can cook them after the chicken is done, off the grill and resting.  That's better for the chicken anyway and will help you conserve enough cooking grate space to do a good job on the sprouts and bacon.  About 15 minutes before the chicken is done, start a fresh chimney's worth of charcoal so your fire will be hot when the chicken comes off and the sprouts go on. 

 

BDL 

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Your plan is too ambitious to be convenient or fun.  Don't cook the Brussel sprouts on the lower charcoal grate.  You're setting yourself up for a lot of heartache. 

I was thinking similar.  I'd steam them or saute them in a skillet in the house ahead of time, and warm them up over the coals... but cooking under the chicken will likely be a greasy disappointment.

post #7 of 8

The original idea is to catch the drippings on the sprouts, but all that you really need is to collect drippings unburnt.  A thick ceramic dish with some foil around the perimiter for some shielding will do this, this being how I roast chicken in a regular oven while roasting the veg seperate and at the same time, silicone mats can provide added insulation to prevent bottom overbrowning/burning here.

 

Collect in this way and as per BDL  do the sprouts seperate.  If you collect similar goo as I do with a whole chicken, and thin it, it's possibly worth it.

 

Rick

post #8 of 8

Making the easy  process a big production simply to save some drippings. Like BDL says use bacon drippings and if you like add chopped bacon

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