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Creme Brulee getting soft

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

How long will the the burnt sugar stay hard on creme brulee, if refrigerate?  I make it and torch the sugar right before serving.  If I burn the sugar and then refrigerate it, how long will it be good?  Thanks

post #2 of 9

Depends on humidity factor of your fridge. I torch them right before serving. Then I don't have to worry, never run and never soggy or soft.

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #3 of 9
If caramel at the bottom is refrigerated together w/ the flan or brulee overnight it will liquify the next day when unmolded. Torching will keep it hard and crunchy when done right b4 serving as what Chef Ed Buchanan mentioned.
post #4 of 9

Now I'm confused!

 

The reference to caramel with regards to flan makes some sense, but I fail to see how that transfers to Crème Brûlée.

 

Perhaps I've been educated incorrectly, but I do not think  Crème Brûlée involves caramel.

 

I do agree that if the Crème Brûlée is stored with the crystallized sugar top the quality will suffer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prettycake View Postough

If caramel at the bottom is refrigerated together w/ the flan or brulee overnight it will liquify the next day when unmolded. Torching will keep it hard and crunchy when done right b4 serving as what Chef Ed Buchanan mentioned.
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #5 of 9

I also torch mine right before service. Otherwise you will get condensation on the top, thus becoming soft.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #6 of 9
Brulee or flan, they are similar. Its not chocolate cake and roast beef. No big deal.
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prettycake View Post

Brulee or flan, they are similar. Its not chocolate cake and roast beef. No big deal.


This is Cheftalk.  It is a big deal, and there is a difference.  A huge difference.

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prettycake View Post

Brulee or flan, they are similar. Its not chocolate cake and roast beef. No big deal.

Prettycake, I respectfully disagree.

 

Granted, they are both custards, but beyond that they are not similar, either in preparation nor presentation, at least the way I've been taught. over the past, um, let's just say in excess of 50 years and leave it at that.

 

Perhaps your education is different.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
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post #9 of 9

Just torch them before serving. I think they are better that way. It just isn't the way they are supposed to be when torched then served after sometime, you know since we're dealing with sugar. :) I hope this helps...
 

Information w/o testing and validation is just data.

Information comprehended w/o testing and validation is just opinion.

INFORMATION COMPREHENDED WITH TESTING AND VALIDATION IS KNOWLEDGE.

I don't just read/write recipes and try them out; I study, analyze, test, validate and revalidate them. :)

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Information w/o testing and validation is just data.

Information comprehended w/o testing and validation is just opinion.

INFORMATION COMPREHENDED WITH TESTING AND VALIDATION IS KNOWLEDGE.

I don't just read/write recipes and try them out; I study, analyze, test, validate and revalidate them. :)

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