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Help needed on knife purchase

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hi, I am planning my first proper knife purchase, and would like some advice on knife and sharpening choices.

 

i'm planning on purchasing a 240mm gyuto, and sharpening equipment necessary to maintain it.

 

Currently, I'm using a Victorinox fibrox 8-inch chef knife. While the knife works pretty well for me, there are several things about it that I really don't care for. For one, I'm not a fan of the profile, the angled handle and all that belly means that I'm pumping (to borrow the phrase from BDL) the handle more than I'd like to. Also, whenever I cut something "juicy" with it, such as barlett pear or potato, the food sticks to the blade like there's no tomorrow.

 

I use a pinch grip, and the cutting motion I uses are chop, push cutting, and draw.

 

The knife will only be used on vegetables and raw proteins, which I think qualifies me for a laser. My only reservation about laser is sticking, as I understand thinner knives tend to stick more than thicker knives, since there's just not as much thickness for it to convex.

 

For steel, I would like it to be stainless, or at least semi-stainless. I don't think I'm ready for carbon yet.

 

I understand the necessity of sharpening, as all knives will get dull eventually. For now, I don't want to get too much into sharpening, and would like to stay with a guided system. Namely the minosharp 3 and edge pro.

 

Budget is $200-300 for knife and sharpening. Which bring me to my next question: For $300, is it better to spend ~$100 on sharpening (i.e. minosharp 3) and $200 on knife, or to spend ~$200 on sharpening (i.e. edge pro) and $100 on knife?

 

In summary, I'm looking for a 240mm gyuto that:

-with a flater profile

-release food well

-in stainless or semi-stainless steel and

-a sharpening system without too much of a learning curve

 

Much appreciated.

 

David


Edited by 1buttercream - 2/1/13 at 10:13pm
post #2 of 9

I use a Victorinox Fibrox for work and understand how it 'grabs' food often. The profile and handle never really bothered me though, and the fact that it's inexpensive and the edge retention is decent is why it's my main workhorse.

 

If your concern is for something that'll release food, you should look into something that has a convex grind, as opposed to a flat grind. You'll sacrifice getting super thin cuts, but that might be something you're not too worried about. Off the top of my head I think Glestain and Misono have gyutos with convex grinds, Misono being the better imho.

 

I have always been under the impression that if you truly value your knives, that you should steer clear of guided sharpening systems completely. In my infant days of cooking I briefly used them; I may be wrong and maybe with advances in technology there's a decent guided system now. But I've since then have always used whetstones and have been thrilled with the results (and think my knives are happier about that).

 

I'm not a super expert and sure someone more knowledgable can chime in, but from personal experience this is what I would recommend. Good luck!


Edited by Junglist - 2/4/13 at 7:12am

'A fool can't act the wise, but the wise can act a fool...' - Kweli

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'A fool can't act the wise, but the wise can act a fool...' - Kweli

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post #3 of 9

ceramic...
 

post #4 of 9

take a look at this one.  price is $197.00.  should fit the bill. 

http://epicedge.com/shopexd.asp?id=85649

scott

Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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post #5 of 9

japanesechefsknife.com

 

A lot of good info about sharpening as well as a selection of gyutos

post #6 of 9

In regards to the knife, what about a Glestain? It has a very unique look, and was specifically designed to not have food stick to the blade - especially starchy foods! The 240mm Gyuto is approx $240, depending on where you purchase it from. We do sell them (shameless plug) as well as Korin and japanesechefsknife. They might be listed on other websites, but I don't know how much they can be trusted. Not a well known knife brand, but definitely worth looking into.

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the recommendations. I think my current priority is to establish which part of my budget is for sharpening, and which part is for the knife. I know there are good knives at around $100, and an edge pro at around $200 can sharpen them well. If, instead, my sharpening method will be the minoaharp3, does the sharpness I'll get from the minosharp3 warrant a $200 knife?

Much appreciated.
post #8 of 9

HI all! First time here.  I have a variety of knives but finally was able to purchase my first expensive one.  I decided upon a Shun Premier 6 in chef and it is absolutely awesome.  The handle is a beautiful shape that fits my hand perfectly and the knive is amazingly balanced. So sharp...just glides through everything. I hate the Shun classic...the Premier line is much nicer and more professional. I can't wait to purchase an 8in next. One reason I chose Shun is that I could go find them at the store and hold them. I was concerned to order some of the  Japanese ones that I could only see in pics online.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1buttercream View Post

Thanks for all the recommendations. I think my current priority is to establish which part of my budget is for sharpening, and which part is for the knife. I know there are good knives at around $100, and an edge pro at around $200 can sharpen them well. If, instead, my sharpening method will be the minoaharp3, does the sharpness I'll get from the minosharp3 warrant a $200 knife?

Much appreciated.

Spend the bulk on the knife. For anything but super-fancy carbon, in my experience, wickedly sharp is wickedly sharp, and everything will depend on the knife and the technique, granted a decent stone. (Get a King 1k and learn to sharpen: don't use a Minosharp on a deent knife!)

 

Case in point: I bought my wife a Masamoto VG 240 gyuto. I have some pretty hard-core knives and stones. I find that it simply isn't worth the trouble to polish this excellent knife: 2k on a great stone (Chocera) isn't significantly lesser than 6k, and it just doesn't polish smoothly or easily. By contrast, my Masamoto KS knives (270 wa-gyuto and 150 ajikiri/deba) start to freak me out at 6k, and with 10k are a joy.

 

Remember that you can always buy a higher-grit stone, and use both, but if you buy a second gyuto you'll end up using one or the other.

 

be sure to tell us what you got in the end — and enjoy!

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