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Stealing from the kitchen - Page 3

post #61 of 63

Brilliant.  Agree 100%.  Nice to see NYC spell it out. 

post #62 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdm magic View Post

 

I don't care if somethings a company rule, if I know its a waste of time, I ain't doing it. And if I'm challenged on it, I'll explain in an even keeled manner why I think its a waste of time, and why I don't do it.

Unless you participated in the formation of the company rule, it is rare that you understand all the factors behind the rule and why the company does not consider it a waste of time. Companies do NOT create rules to waste time, time is money and companies do NOT waste money!

 

If you wish to continue to be employed, may I suggest you comply with the rule as set forth by the company and, if you disagree with the purpose, procedure, or consider it a waste of time state that to your superior, in writing, AFTER you have complied with the rule.

 

My employee handbook has a very clear statement: "...Failure to comply with any company rule may result in immediate termination for cause.", and every employee initials that statement specifically as well as signing an acknowledgement that they have received, read, and understand the employee handbook.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #63 of 63

Leeniak, I'm with you.  I've always been very anal about stealing, probably since I was 6 and first heard the ten commandments.  Or maybe someone took a toy away.  Dunno, but I am.

 

As far as following company rules, goes, the definition is "a principle or regulation governing conduct, action, procedure, arrangement, etc".

 

That's also why laws are made, in my opinion, to keep some semblance of order.  In AA there are twelve steps to the program.  Leave a few out and watch what happens.

 

I once trained at a chain restaurant.  Won 6 out of the seven awards, coming in second with first aid.  This wasn't because I was smart, I'm not.  It was because I was fairly obsessive about learning and following proper procedures.  I was (am) very particular about following proper portion control, procedures, etc.  If we employees were allowed to pick and choose which ones we wanted to follow and just ignore the ones we didn't, it would have a been ridiculous mess.  Can't imagine anything worse for a restaurant than kitchen anarchy.

 

Besides, if the man is paying me to conduct myself and my work in a particular way, I owe him the respect of doing it.  If I didn't understand why something was done a certain way, I may ask to discuss it with him, but after the discussion if he still wants things his way, that's the way it's gonna be...after all, it is his place.  And his money.  And his procedures.

 

How could an owner or store manager ever promote me to a position where I was to train others, if he couldn't trust me do it right myself?

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