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Duck breast with OJ and red wine sauce - need help

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hello, I am in culinary school and I am cooking a pan seared duck breast with port wine and OJ sauce on a piece of potato pave. My chef likes the idea but he wants me to add something else that shows "skill" he doesn't want me to just cook up a duck breast. I don't really know what else I could add to the duck that would go well with the sauce and the potato. I was thinking making the sauce into a foam or something like that but I'm not to sure. All help is welcome! Thank you
post #2 of 13

How about adding some pearl onions into your sauce along with a few orange segments?

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
I could try that. But I think he wants to see more of a technique also added to it. I'm lost haha
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
I could try that. But I think he wants to see more of a technique also added to it. I'm lost haha
post #5 of 13

a red wine sauce with orange juice would work well as a gastrique. meaning a sugar/vinegar kind of sauce. create a light caramel, put in some orange juice to stop it from further browning, and mix with a red wine reduction (make a duck jus and add it too this) balancing sweet and acidity. you could use it as a glaze or as a sauce. also look into using the rest of the duck. and try to look at duck a l'orange and coq au vin recipes... they are french classics and can be played with. for color on the plate, look towards carrots, onions and peas. 

 

Also make sure that u get that skin crispy and the fat rendered!!!! maybe even take off the skin and make a bit of crackling. let us know how it goes. 

 

hp

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HPross View Post

a red wine sauce with orange juice would work well as a gastrique. meaning a sugar/vinegar kind of sauce. create a light caramel, put in some orange juice to stop it from further browning, and mix with a red wine reduction (make a duck jus and add it too this) balancing sweet and acidity. you could use it as a glaze or as a sauce. also look into using the rest of the duck. and try to look at duck a l'orange and coq au vin recipes... they are french classics and can be played with. for color on the plate, look towards carrots, onions and peas. 

Also make sure that u get that skin crispy and the fat rendered!!!! maybe even take off the skin and make a bit of crackling. let us know how it goes. 

hp
I'll definitely try that idea with the sauce, what I do is sweat some shallots and garlic in a little goose fat I have, add and reduce a tbsp of balsamic, put in some rosemary, add 1/3 cup of o.j and reduce, add and reduce 1/2 cup of stock, than add 1/2 cup of port wine and reduce by half and season. I would try using more of the bird but we have a $28 cap on the 4 coarse menu for 2. I have mushroom tart, with olives, sundries tomatoes, white balsamic reduction, arugula, feta cheese and pine nuts on a puff pastry. Trio of scallops, poached, tartare and pan seared. The duck on potato pave, maybe a nice fresh slaw or simple veg. And a creme brûlée with a berry sphere on top. So I am only a dollar and a bit away from the limit.
I like the idea of crackling, when I've done it before ever time it seems to leave at least a few mm. of fat on top. What is the best way to do the crackling? Ill let you know how it goes and upload pictures of it as well! Thanks for the feedback and help
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
I also had to cut corners a little by using bay scallops instead of sea for the tartare just to get the $1 difference. But every bit counts
post #8 of 13

the easiest way to cook the skin it to put it between sheets of silicone paper and between 2 baking trays, then put it in the over till browned. they may feel soft, but if browned well, you will have a few secs to mould the skin - maybe around a rolling pin...or just leave it to cool between the baking trays. check out this web site - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jezlyn/3643731421/ for pics. this lady didn't use a top baking tray, so they arent flat, but still look delicious. 

 

you could try to do this in a deep fryer - though experimentation is needed. if u want to try - use low temp 130-150c, but not so low that it comes out rock hard - when i did this a while back, i chipped a tooth trying to figure out what works best. 

 

cooking time will vary greatly on which duck you get. fattier skinned ones either need more time at a lower temp (to render the extra fat) or need to be trimmed appropriately. 

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Looks and sounds delicious. Definitely going to give it a try this weekend when I practice once more for the exam. Thank you
post #10 of 13

so how did you do?

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hey so it was on Thursday. Went really well, all the food came out great. The only thing that got me was my "sous chef" was messy so I got some marks deducted. Other than that it was good!
post #12 of 13

well done! keep up the good work. 

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thank you, I really appreciate it!
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