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Question RE Potato Pancakes - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Thread Starter 

All said and done, I just finished making another - my second - batch this morning.  And yes, the baking powder does add a bit of fluff, airyness, to the patty.  Neither being a restauranteur nor chef, when it comes to making a half dozen of 'em or less then I see no point in 'prebaking' the patties in the oven as one poster suggested.  Yet, if I had to make dozens for a huge group, I can certain surmise why the prebake would be quite helpful.

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-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #32 of 51

How did they brown up though?

 

licklips.gif

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #33 of 51

Make dozens?? Try thousands  Can you imagine having 2 cooks standing in front of hot skillets making them?  I sure can't

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post #34 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post

How did they brown up though?

 

licklips.gif


The hotter the oil, the browner they turned out.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #35 of 51

Brownness also depends on sugar content of potato

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post #36 of 51

The hotter the oil the faster they burn to.

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post #37 of 51
Thread Starter 

Both previous replies are, indeed, correct.  But I need to experiment further to find the 'right' temperature for frying.  And also my frying medium is a combination of lard and bacon/hog jowl fat.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #38 of 51

Once you find the cooking temp to get the perfectly crunchy outside but not overdone inside; you can then play with the amount of baking powder (ph) of the potatoes to get them to your desired golden brown colour.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #39 of 51
Once you find the cooking temp to get the perfectly crunchy outside but not overdone inside; you can then play with the amount of baking powder (ph) of the potatoes to get them to your desired golden brown colour.

 

You're confusing baking soda with baking powder.  Baking soda's buffering power is negated by the additions of liquid soluble, dry acids; and (in the case of "double acting") pyrophosphates in baking powder.  No amount of baking powder will move the pH very much.  Harold McGee actually discusses this in the article you cited, to me; Alkaline or Acid

 

And, whether or not raising the pH of food helps it brown better, I doubt you could put enough baking soda in potato pancakes to help with browning without making them taste absolutely obnoxious.  As McGee said, it takes a LOT of baking soda to make a visible difference. 

 

BDL

post #40 of 51

You won't find utopia as far as temp, because every time you add another pancake the temp of oil will change.. Thats why I like my way of oven set and dry then .deep fry, there is more oil therefore less temp variation.   They come out crisp on outside  just right on inside and best of all  NOT GREASY or limp or burned. and all uiform in color,. This method is used for volume , but it also works at home.. Most  commercial brands Simplot and Old Fashioned Heinz( Oreida) are produced like this. I am a firm believer in classical cooking and prep, but in this procedure I find it better then standing by a hot pan ,over a hot stove eand frying them a few at a time and they come out as good or better.

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post #41 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post

You won't find utopia as far as temp, because every time you add another pancake the temp of oil will change.. Thats why I like my way of oven set and dry then .deep fry, there is more oil therefore less temp variation.   They come out crisp on outside  just right on inside and best of all  NOT GREASY or limp or burned. and all uiform in color,. This method is used for volume , but it also works at home.. Most  commercial brands Simplot and Old Fashioned Heinz( Oreida) are produced like this. I am a firm believer in classical cooking and prep, but in this procedure I find it better then standing by a hot pan ,over a hot stove eand frying them a few at a time and they come out as good or better.

I'll then give it some more tries.

 

-T

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #42 of 51

Potato pancakes are supposed to be flat and dense.

post #43 of 51
Potato pancakes are supposed to be flat and dense.

 

Sez you.

 

BDL

post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyandotte View Post

Potato pancakes are supposed to be flat and dense.

 

Hmm...

 

What's your opinion on Matzo Balls?

post #45 of 51

I don't eat those.  It's not my ethnic background.
 

post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyandotte View Post

I don't eat those.  It's not my ethnic background.

 

 

 

 

That doesn't mean you don't eat it.  I'm not French but I love demiglace.

 

Anyway, who makes potato pancakes the way you describe?

post #47 of 51

My mum and everyone else I know.  Maybe Martha Stewart, too.  Nothing wrong with making them fluffy but that's not the original way and I came to like the old fashioned ones of my childhood.   The chewier and heavier, the better.  smile.gif

 

I tried with baking powder once and the result just seemed a bit odd, that's all.  No, I'm not a chef, just a cook.

post #48 of 51

Since you don't eat food that isn't in your ethnic background - i'd like to know...what background prepares their potato pancakes like you say?

 

What original way, like what old fashioned ones?

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #49 of 51

I didn't say that eating flattened, dense pancakes was unique to any particular ethnicity. (I'm European.) Only that that's what I learned at home and having tried the fluffy ones are just not my personal preference.   I do sometimes cook from other ethnic groups, I do like curry from time to time.  That's hardly my background. 

post #50 of 51

Ah OK now we have it! 

post #51 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post

Let me give you a tip on the modern way to make Potato Pancakes or Latkas . German style uses flour  Jewish style a little Matzo meal. Make whatever mix you want. Now take a clean sheetpan and heat it in a 300 oven. Spray with pam or pan spray Take it out spoon pancake  whatever size you use onto hot pan. place back in oven  let cook till pancake sets but not brown. Take out and set asside.Cool slightly and remove from pan with wide spatula  Now for service just drop the blanched pancakes  in fryolator and cook till golden . You will find it less greasy then frying pan version and a heck of a lot quicker and cleaner. And it sure as hell beats standing by a hot stove frying 10 or 15 at a time.


Why pre-heat the sheet pan?  For a quicker "set" I suppose, like preheating the sheet pan prior to blind baking a tart/quiche crust?

 

EDIT:  Alright, I pre-heated the sheet pan, removed it from the oven and lined it with a sheet of parchement paper and "applied" the P.P.'s.  They were baked in the upper third of a 300F oven for twenty minutes and removed to cool.  They had set with the egg mixture binding the shredded potato strands with no apparent "liquid" remaining.  The P.P.'s were removed from the parchement using a spatula and set onto a wire rack to cool.  Looking at the spent parchement I noticed a spot of moisture remaining from each of the pancakes.  Perhaps I should lengthen the baking time a bit??


Edited by kokopuffs - 5/26/13 at 9:05am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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