or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › looking for a cookie recipe
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

looking for a cookie recipe

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Anyone have a cookie recipe that is comparable to Pepperidge Farms' Bordeau cookies? I have a bride that wants about 800 of these but doesn't want to buy the prepackage cookies. She wants them freshly baked and I suppose I can't blame her because just baked cookies are the best but I'm having trouble coming up with a recipe. Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 25
Maybe you'd have better luck if you described the cookie in question.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
post #3 of 25
Oooh I love Bordeaux cookies. Ill hunt around and see what I find as to a recipe. BRB.

Jodi
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
post #4 of 25
Here are some internet sites you might try. The first one takes requests, and has a bunch of links to other copycat sites that might have what you're looking for if these don't.

www.hungrybrowser.com/phaedrus/

www.copykat.com

www.recipelink.com/copycat.html
post #5 of 25
Aren't the Bordeaux two "langue de chat" (cat's tongues) with dark ganache sandwiched between?
Langue de Chat recipes should be easy to find. Maybe in Julia's Matering the Art of French Cooking? Or check Nick Malgieri's cookie book.

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply
post #6 of 25
I think the Bordeaux is round, flat, and maybe some kind of spice cookie. The Milano is, I think, the cat's tongue kind of thing. Malgieri has a recipe for canary tongues which is really easy and makes a very nice cookie, which could easily be sandwiched with chocolate.
It's not Dairy Queen.
Reply
It's not Dairy Queen.
Reply
post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks all for the info....cat's tongues?....my computer was giving trouble and I wasn't able to get online but I'll give some of those sites a visit. M
post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks all for the info....cat's tongues?....my computer was giving trouble and I wasn't able to get online but I'll give some of those sites a visit. M
post #9 of 25
Milanos are the ones with the chocolate, some flavored with orange some with mint. Bordeaux are "rectangular" and very thin. I think there are 4 pounds of butter per cookie :)
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
Reply
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
Reply
post #10 of 25
Definately buttery and absolutely decadent KyleW :D

I have to sneak em into my house or Ill get attacked by the whole family and left with crumbs. :lol: I still havent found a recipe for these things though. :(
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
post #11 of 25
mbcakes,

I'm going to have to lean towards agreeing that French "Langues de Chat"
cookies/biscuits (aka "Cat's Tongue" and "Lenguas De Gato") may be an alternative to Pepperidge Farm's Bordeaux cookies. They are thin and crisp as are the Distinctive Bordeaux Cookies. A chocolate coating is optional as is sandwiching chocolate in between two cookies as are nuts.



You may want to check the The French Cookie Book: Classic and Contemporary Recipes for Easy and Elegant Cookies By Bruce Healy to see if you can't find something else.

As Kyle stated, the Pepperidge Farm version is rectangular with rounded corners. No icing or chocolate. Sheer simplicity.

Here are several sources for recipes you may want to check out:

Langues de Chat

Langues de Chat II

Langues de Chat III

Langues de Chat IV

Langues de Chat V

Langues de Chat VI

Langues de Chat VII

Langues de Chat VIII

Langues de Chat IX

Langues de Chat X
post #12 of 25
I don't know much about Pepperidge Farm cookies, but isn't it the Milano's that are like langue de chat (in shape anyway)?
post #13 of 25
When described with words, both the Bordeaux and Milano have the same shape: rectangular with rounded corners. The Milano are less crispy, have a smooth surface, a tad thicker, and much lighter in color compared to the Bordeaux which are very crispy, darker in color, more flat but with a rougher texture on top. The Milano are a little more elongated and each end is a little more oval than the Bordeaux which have straighter sides at each end.
post #14 of 25
You guys are right.. I didn't mean to confuse anyone.
I just like saying (and typing) "Langues de Chat"---eating them too---with or without fillings.
:lips: meaoow:lips:

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply
post #15 of 25
I believe the one circled in red is the Bordeaux cookie in question

Included are Bordeaux, Milano, Brussels, Geneva, Chocolate Pirouettes and Raspberry Tarts.



:)
post #16 of 25
I peeked at the ingredients on the Bordeaux package and it lists invert sugar. The front of the package promises something to do with caramelization or something. so that's probably how they get the cookie that color and that flavor. Good luck figuring that one out.
It's not Dairy Queen.
Reply
It's not Dairy Queen.
Reply
post #17 of 25
Interesting point thebighat. Invert sugars help baked goods retain moisture, prolongs shelf-life, reduce crystallisation, and adds crust color.

Using an invert sugar allows you to use half the amount of regular sugar called for in a recipe. Examples of invert sugars are honey, glucose, corn syrup, and trimoline.

I believe in this case the best thing to do would be to stick with good baking sugar so the recipe would be the "homemade from scratch" version. My guess is that the invert sugar is being used in this case primarily to act as a preservative.

You can make your own invert sugar by using the following recipe:
Add 8 pounds of sugar to 2 pints of water and 1/2 teaspoon of citric or tartaric acid. Bring to a boil and stir for 30 minutes. Add water to make up 9 pints of solution. There is one pound of sugar in each pint.
post #18 of 25
One of the country club members shoved in my direction a recipe from a game preserve in S. Africa called Singita, on very classy paper, a recipe for oatmeal cookies that called for treacle brown sugar. I have no idea what that is so I subbed for 1/3 of the brown sugar using molasses. Made nice cookies. This guy says this is a really top end resort and he travels a LOT. But it got me thinking, there are probably more wacky kinds of places people who do what we do for a living could work than you could think of. A game preserve for los ricos bastardos. Who woulda thought?

(I just did a yahoo search for singita game preserve. check it out. mind-boggling.)
It's not Dairy Queen.
Reply
It's not Dairy Queen.
Reply
post #19 of 25
I can buy treacle here, it is butterscotchy in flavor, thick thick syrup.
CChiu that is soooo cool that you can circle pictures.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #20 of 25
shroomgirl,

Not hard at all my friend, if you ever need to do it, just let me know.

;)
post #21 of 25

did you ever find the Bordeaux recipe

I am looking for a recipe for cookies like the Bordeaux. Did you ever find one or a nice substitute.
post #22 of 25
post #23 of 25
What is that rolled triangular one on the bottom?
post #24 of 25
Thanks for the recipes. I'll be giving them all a try.
post #25 of 25
\

That's the Pirouette cookie. It's a tuile cookie (very thin, rolled while still hot). Sometimes they have a creme filling similar to the filling in a sandwich cookie.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › looking for a cookie recipe