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Cooking a Prime Rib

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I have recently started as the head chef at a small B&B and have a prime rib problem.  I would like to cook the 18-20 lb. boneless rib low and slow as I have been told but can't. I need a suggestion to make an excellent prime.  Here is my problem, I arrive at work usually2 hours before dinner service starts.  I then immediatly pull out the prime to cook and prepare it as I have been told by the owners.  I then place the prime in a 300 degree oven and cook a full prime for 2 hours.  When I temp the meat it is usually around  90 degrees and is quite rare in the middle.  I cannot seem to get the owner to pull the prime out of the cooler earlier so it come up closer to room temp and I cannot go in earlier to do this myself.  Any suggestions on how I can make a better prime for the inn?

post #2 of 5

1/2 hour at 450, then turn it down to 325.

post #3 of 5

Can you buy a prime rib that weighs less than the 18-20 pounders you are getting now ?

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply
post #4 of 5


Kuan wrote:

1/2 hour at 450, then turn it down to 325.

Yes to that, with a minor niggle.  Rather than starting at 450F, I'd just crank the oven as high as it goes. 

 

FWIW, 90F is not "rare," it's RAW and COLD.  So, for that matter is 110F. 

 

Rare, and that's pretty darn rare, is 120F.  The most carry-over temperature rise you can get is around 10F; but the lower the thicker the piece of meat (rib is thick), the lower the internal temp, and the lower the external temp (depends on oven temp), the lower the carry over.  Unfortunately, there's no getting around the laws of thermodynamics. 

 

If you closely wrap in foil or (commercial grade) cling wrap (which I think works better than foil), and hold in a well insulated cooler, you might get a 7F increase in temp; so if you're looking for a rare center, pull at 115F.  If you leave the roast in a pan and cover that with foil (i.e. a "loose" wrap), figure 5F carry over.

 

Berndy made a good point too.  But rather than ordering different roasts, you might consider cutting the roasts in half before cooking. 

 

Your employer seems to have a lot to say, so I'd discuss any changes with him before making them.

 

BDL

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

They purchase a case of prime which consists of 5 prime rib, and yes depending on the head count I do cut the prime to size.  I am able to discuss many ideas I have with the owners but I am having a hard time trying to get them to  at least bring the prime out of the cooler to at least get it slightly warmed up.  I have a very small kitchen with a 6 burner range and a flattop both with ovens and a convection oven in the back prep area but the baker uses that three days a week to bake all our baked goods for the week.  I have a short window of time to prep the prime, they like it scored and rubbed with olive oil then seasoned with garlic and rosemary as well as calgary seasoning.  that leaves me a roughly 2 hour window until service to cook the prime in.  I am not saying it is a bad product I wish it could be a better product if it was cooked properly.

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