or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

chocolate yield

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I'm fairly inexperienced with deserts.  For valentine's day I made a bunch of chocolate truffles for the girls at work.  Once they had their fill I let the cooks try them, and they started asking me questions about how to make them.  One wanted to know about the process of chocolate making.  I confess I made these from commercially made chocolate, because I didn't want to go through the time of tempering it.  What he was really asking about was making the stuff straight from nibs.  My interest now peaked too, I looked around and searched the web and found some cocoa beans selling between $8-$10/lb plus shipping.  So if i'm spending up to $20 for 1 pound of these, what kind of yield can I expect? (I understand that this will depend on the sweetness of the final product.

 

Also, is there a really good book one could recommend for chocolate confectionery using chocolate made from both cocoa powders and nibs?

post #2 of 7

You're looking for a lot more than you bargained for.........

 

To make decent chocolate, you will need milling machines.

 

First you roast the beans, then remove the shell, then crush = nibs.  You can also roast nibs, but will have to shell the beans.

Then you mill it, as fine as possible.

 

Hang on, it's not that simple...

 

A cocoa bean naturally contains over 52% cocoa butter. When you mill whole roasted beans you get "Cocoa mass" a.k.a."cocoa liquor".  When warm, this stuff is like peanut butter--very stiff.  Most mnfctrs add additional cocoa butter to thin the mass out, so you can mold and enrobe with it.

 

Then comes the sugar.

Again, it's not that simple...

 

Chocolate doesn't contain any water--or at the very least between .5% - .7% water.  Sugar won't dissolve in fat (cocoa butter).  So you have to mill the sugar very fine, much finer than powdered sugar.

 

Then you mill the whole shebang.  Your tongue can detect particle sizes of around 20 microns, stuff courser  than this feels gritty or course on your tongue and roof of your mouth.  The chocolate is milled to sub-20 micron sizes, so it feels smoooooth and suave on the tongue.  Every mnfctr has a secret process: Conching mills, ball mills, roller mills, wet grinders, etc. etc.  This can take up to 72 hours, with most mnfctrs conching their chocolates 50-60 hrs.  And then tempering and casting.

 

 

So now you know th reason why there are so few chocolate mnfctrs, and almost no "artisan" or small mnfctrs.  It is a lot of work and needs a lot of specialized equipment.

 

Oh, and the quality of the chocolate depends greatly on the quality of the beans... 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

I spent a few hours researching that process.  What Im really curious about is the cost difference.  Therefor, does anyone know the yield of a pound of cocoa beans?

post #4 of 7

All depends on the moisture content of the beans when you buy them,  how much shell is included with the bean, how much sugar you are adding, how much additional cocoa butter you adding, and if you are going to add all sorts of other crap--milk powder for instance, into a dark chocolate (Hersheys likes to do this).

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
I thought powdered milk was only for making it from cocoa powder. Not even a ballpark answer?
post #6 of 7

Two worlds in Chocolate: US standards and European standards.

 

For "Chocolate" in Europe:  Cocoa mass/liquor, cocoa butter, sugar, vanilla, and soy lecethin are allowed.  Nothing else.  If any milk powder is in, even as small as .5% it MUST be labled as "Milk Chocolate".

 

US Standards:  Must contain at least 35% cocoa content.  This is the same for Bittersweet, semi-sweet,  and sweet chocolates.  After that, anything goes.  For "milk Chocolate" it must contain at least 10% cocoa content.  Ol' Man Hershey paid a lot to get those rules made into law.......... 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

I'm not going to go through that much trouble so I can end up with a Hershey bar.  I'm not even looking for an accurate answer.  Let's say I'm looking to make an chocolate of 80% cocoa.  If i'm starting with 1 lb of beans (realistically 12 oz of nibs after shelling) how much chocolate might that yield.  See, I can already answer this for chocolate made from cocoa powder and can thus compare the cost difference to the commercial made chocolate selling for about $3/lb at the grocery store.

 

I understand that made from the bean is going to be way more expensive, but I'm just curious about the yield.  If i can't get a rough answer i'll just find out in a week's time.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking