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Pasta: do you serve it with the sauce on top? Or mix it all together, then plate? - Page 2

post #31 of 43

After many tries and soo many re-reads of threads like this one.....

TA-DA!

I was able to get my timing right on point and the sauce was finished and waiting for the pasta.

Still hot.

Was able to finish the sauce and it was still steaming when the timer went off for my slightly too al dente noodles.

I used a pair of tongs to move the noodles from the water to the pan, dragging a bit of the water along.

Was just enough (water) to thin things down and pasta was just at the right stage that it finished cooking as well as thickening things back up.

Just wanted to thank those of you who graciously answer the same questions over and over, patiently explaining things in different ways so people like me (not a reader learner, but can look at a technique a few times and nail it)  can finally ace a dish.

Oh and sorry if I was a bit redundant in my posting.

Feel like a little kid.

 

mimi

post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

After many tries and soo many re-reads of threads like this one.....

TA-DA!

I was able to get my timing right on point and the sauce was finished and waiting for the pasta.

Still hot.

Was able to finish the sauce and it was still steaming when the timer went off for my slightly too al dente noodles.

I used a pair of tongs to move the noodles from the water to the pan, dragging a bit of the water along.

Was just enough (water) to thin things down and pasta was just at the right stage that it finished cooking as well as thickening things back up.

Just wanted to thank those of you who graciously answer the same questions over and over, patiently explaining things in different ways so people like me (not a reader learner, but can look at a technique a few times and nail it)  can finally ace a dish.

Oh and sorry if I was a bit redundant in my posting.

Feel like a little kid.

 

mimi

 

Glad it worked out.  Don't be overly concerned with timing the noodles and the sauce just right.  Usually the sauce can be made and left to wait while the noodles are cooked just right.  Unless it's a clam sauce and you want the clams to be served fresh and steamy rather than left too long to become rubbery.  But even then I remove the clams when they are just a little underdone, and go ahead with the noodles and by the time I'm ready to serve I toss the clams back in to reheat.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #33 of 43

smiles.gif

I love clams.

 

mimi

post #34 of 43

Depends on the dish.

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post #35 of 43

The benefit of adding a small amount of pasta water in the finishing process is the starch in the water gives a nice velvety gloss to the dish. The salt from the pasta water also adds extra flavour. The trick is not adding too much.
 

post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

I've never heard of anyone doing that, FF!  I've only heard of finishing it in the sauce.   I can't imagine how that would work, pasta needs so much liquid to cook right without becoming gummy, and then wouldn't you have a ton of sauce on it?  watery sauce at that?  And if sauce boils at a rolling boil as you need to cook pasta, it might reduce but then it would burn, and otherwise it would be too liquidy. How do you solve that?

 

The only cooking in anything i ever heard of is boiling the broccoletti (broccoli rabe) or something in the same water along with the pasta, but since both are then normally drained, the water is all drained off.  Then you'd finish the mixture of both in oil and garlic and hot pepper, as you would have finished the vegetable alone. 

I was surprised when i came here that most people even cook soup pasta or rice for soup separately and then mix in the end, not to cloud the soup. 

I believe he is referring to working with fresh made pasta based on his post... and this would make some sense.  When using fresh pasta, you basically just need a 2 minute soak in the boiling water.  set it aside to drain.  then add it to a pan with some of your sauce and some of the pasta water.  the starchy pasta water does a good job of adding to your red sauce.  im not really sure of the science behind it, but its the method my family has used in their italian restaraunt for years and always produces a great result...especially with a bolognese.

post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamaster14 View Post

I believe he is referring to working with fresh made pasta based on his post

No, I was referring to dry pasta. I even posted a recipe from a 3 star michelin chef, Alain Ducasse, who makes this recipe. 

 

Anyway, a friend of mine who's a chef showed me how to do that (cook the pasta from dry, directly in the sauce). And me too, when I saw him do that, I thought I was hallucinating. But then we ate his pasta and it was delicious. Since then I've done it many times, and it's a great different way to cook pasta. Try it one day. 

post #38 of 43

oops...redundant

 

mimi

post #39 of 43

Just about every pasta dish I cook I mix it at the end, including loosening with pasta water if needed. My only exception is Spaghetti Bolognese which I alway serve on top.

post #40 of 43

Mix them, the oily source stops the pasta from sticking to each other, this is especially true if I store extra portions and eat it cold later on.

post #41 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

No, I was referring to dry pasta. I even posted a recipe from a 3 star michelin chef, Alain Ducasse, who makes this recipe. 

 

Anyway, a friend of mine who's a chef showed me how to do that (cook the pasta from dry, directly in the sauce). And me too, when I saw him do that, I thought I was hallucinating. But then we ate his pasta and it was delicious. Since then I've done it many times, and it's a great different way to cook pasta. Try it one day. 

Oh it can be done. FF is right .  : risotto style pasta, paying attention to stirring.

 

 8 cups of sauce + 3 cups of water (there is alot of garlic confit in that sauce)

 

 Add dry pasta

 

 Stir on med/high heat. You will see the changes after 5 minutes. Continue cooking for 10 more minutes

 

 Toss in some shrimp or leave as is, done.

 

 

 Done.

 

 

 

 


Edited by petalsandcoco - 5/28/13 at 8:16am

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #42 of 43

Only time I have ever cooked the pasta in sauce is when I made lasagna. It does however require much more sauce as the noodle absorb it but it came out fine. I still make it this way at home not commercially

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post #43 of 43

I've had friends who worked an italian spot that cooked dried pasta by blanching it for a minute or two in water, then adding the nearly hard pasta to the sauce.  They would add water as necessary to cook the pasta.  Its a strange technique and yields a starchier result, but it's still good.

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