or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › In the middle of cooking red beans, and am looking for a salt sub...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

In the middle of cooking red beans, and am looking for a salt sub...

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
...yeah......I know.....I'm right in the middle, so hopefully I get a response quick enough to help....

So I started cooking these red beans, and have added some salt already, already have rendered bacon and fresh garlic and onions that were added at the veggie stage. Now, I've got it simmering with all ingredients save green onion (green part) and parsley to add towards the end....I need it to simmer for about an hour, or so...I've tasted it, and need to add something....what about coriander seed? Any suggestions to before adding more salt? perhaps another garlic, but I want a more 'earthy' taste (hope you know what I mean) than that...
post #2 of 21

Personally, I would sub the parsley for cilantro, for that real bean stew taste. Why green onion? try vidalia, spanish, sweet onion.

 

In also use a home-made sofrito when making my beans, and some tomato sauce. And this might be cheating, but adobo does wonders for beans.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #3 of 21

my favorite solution for "earthiness" is powdered dried mushroom. Buy some inexpensive dried mushrooms from an asian grocer. Let a cheap coffee grinder have it's way with them. Store in a tightly capped jar.

 

No help to you in the middle of cooking your beans, but for next time.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

my favorite solution for "earthiness" is powdered dried mushroom. Buy some inexpensive dried mushrooms from an asian grocer. Let a cheap coffee grinder have it's way with them. Store in a tightly capped jar.

No help to you in the middle of cooking your beans, but for next time.


.......with me.....you never know what I may have in my spice cupboard....Thanks for the tip.
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post

Personally, I would sub the parsley for cilantro, for that real bean stew taste. Why green onion? try vidalia, spanish, sweet onion.

In also use a home-made sofrito when making my beans, and some tomato sauce. And this might be cheating, but adobo does wonders for beans.

Yellow onion, green bell pepper and red chilli pepper started in the 'veggie stage' along with 1 crushed and 1 whole garlic. The green onions are not used save for the green part as a garnish at the end.

Cilantro I love, and have used it in my black bean soup.

Sofrito I don't know what that is....what's it from?

I also wish I had used my vidalia instead of the yellow onion.
post #6 of 21

Sofrito is a mixture of all the ingredients stated above. It can be made and freezed. What I do is I add that and sautee it at the very beginning, in olive oil, or achiote infused oil, then I add additional julienned onions and peppers for extra taste and visual appeal. I also dd pimento olives as well. There are so many ways to make beans. I make them different each and every time. Sometimes I add potatoes, and even cooked chunks of calabaza (which is pumpkin in English)

 

 

here is a sofrito recipe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQKjAHjnxmI

 

That lady gets down with the real sofrito. I make a more americanized version of it. Onions, garlic, cilantro, red and green peppers.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
I also wish I had used stock instead of water......


so, what about:

thyme

fresh lemon juice (very little)

ground coriander

'better than bouillon' chicken additive..
post #8 of 21

Oh yes, stock or broth, never water.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
My first time with this recipe......and first with red beans actually.....I tried to follow it basically, but I never do exactly. I subbed store bought spicy creole seasoning for a fresh chilli pepper, for example.
post #10 of 21

Well I bet your next beans will be kickass  :) I'm sure these beans will turn out fine too.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post

Well I bet your next beans will be kickass  smile.gif I'm sure these beans will turn out fine too.

Thank you, Pollopicu. Know what I love most about cooking? I'm always learning, and it tastes good! smile.gif

I ended up putting in a touch of thyme, before adding some more salt. The thyme helped. One change for sure: Stock!
post #12 of 21

Is that just one crushed and one whole "clove" of garlic?

 

IMHO that's not nearly enough garlic to flavor a pot of beans.

post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Yep, that's all I added. I could add more now, and as we know, adding garlic towards the end brings out more flavor than in the beginning. Perhaps keep it whole so I can fish it out later; if I crush it, I end up with little small chunks. What do you think?
post #14 of 21

I would mince it and I would go a few more cloves. I'd let it cook awhile longer to mellow. Adding raw garlic at the end does make it more assertive but do you want the flavor of raw garlic to overpower everything else? I mean, you might---and that's OK too--but it does play well with other flavors, even when you add a lot, as long as you let the flavors mellow for awhile.

post #15 of 21

I know this is just IMO but I would rather not eat beans if all I could have are bland beans.

All the aromatics and herbs/spices mentioned above will indeed make for a tasty dish (again IMO, just under seasoned).

If you are on a low sodium diet, leave out the bacon (not really enough salt to season anyway) and start using a low sodium stock.

I make my own a couple of times a year but have seen it offered, shelved with the soups, in some of the larger markets.

 

mimi

post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
I am just a learning at-home cook, who likes to cook, not skilled as you guys are; I do like to try though. Here is the recipe I ended up with, and am pleased with the results, though I would change a couple things if I had to do it again right now. Again, this is a slightly vamped version of a dish I was given to do by the boss lady. Fwiw, we're in the winter in Massachusetts presently, so this warm protein is nice for us who are on the go and need a couple meals in the fridge twice a week.

Red Beans and Rice:

Ingredients were....
touch of olive oil
1 lb dried, rinsed and soaked overnight small red beans
1/2 a package of thickly sliced bacon
1 med yellow onion
2 stalks celery, chopped
1 red chilli pepper
1 green bell pepper
1 whole clove, 1 crushed glove garlic
4-5 bay leaves
some thyme (dry-homemade)
fresh crushed black pepper
'fresh' parsley (dry-homemade; the recipe called for fresh, not dried)
bundle of green tops from green onions, chopped
ground Cumin
ground Red Cyan Pepper
Salt
water
Rice

At the end, I'll mention what I would do differently. I won't go into complete detail, for you guys can read between the lines on the easy stuff.
Starting with good bacon, I rendered it with a touch of oil to keep it from sticking to the pot with salt. Removed the bacon, and softened the onions, green bell pepper, red chilli pepper, celery, 1 bay leaf, 1 whole and I chopped garlic on medium heat. When ready, I added the beans, cumin, the rest the bay leaves, fresh ground pepper (I used a pestle and bowl and strainer). When I hard the pot sizzling over medium heat, I turned it off, and covered the pot for 35-40 minutes. My idea here was to get the bean soaking up the bacon fat and spicy flavor. Then I added the bacon, water, ground Cyan pepper and brought it to a boil, stirring occasionally, and then cut back the heat. Slow boiling for an 1hour and 1/2, I tasted it along the way, and felt it was light on seasoning, but didn't want to grab salt first, but add it last, thus my thread. There was good heat from the chilli pepper, cyan and black pepper, so I added another bay leaf and thyme, and that seemed to get what I needed. I then added more salt, and towards the end, a week old dried out parsley of about 4 table spoons, the chopped onion tops, mashed the beans and added more salt as needed. After adding the water, I probably cooked it for 1 3/4 hours before turning it off and covering. It sat in the fridge last night, and today I cooked the rice and had a feta cheese mixed salad with roasted garlic and herb dressing (dry mix--which one day I'll make from scratch!). I'm happy with it, but always believe in improving!

What I've learned from this one so far:
1) Stock over water. This would make a much better flavor impact!
2) MORE onion and probably a mixture of vidalia and yellow. There wasn't a proper balance between bell pepper and onion, and onions lower the need for salt.
3) I liked the thyme, so may keep it in. Too much thyme ain't good, but some gave what I needed.
4) Make that onion mixture Pollopicu was talking about above and locate some dried mushrooms.
5) Flavor test Cilantro vs. Parsley with this recipe.

Questions:

1) How many more fresh cloves (minced, chopped or whole) do you think this recipe needs?
2) What other suggestions/replacements do you have?
post #17 of 21

For a pound of beans I'd probably use at least 4 and probably 5 or 6 large cloves of minced garlic and I'd double the onions. IMO, beans need a LOT of aromatics to make them delicious.

 

If you are sticking with the thyme, I would skip the cilantro and go with fresh parsley. Dried parsley is flavorless. I probably would have skipped the cumin, too, with thyme as an ingredient. They don't strike me as complementary flavors.

 

If you want to go with cilantro, cumin and lime juice are commonly used with cilantro. Don't be shy about quantities of any of the three. You could throw a couple finely chopped jalapenos in there, too. Or chipotles in adobo, adding some of the adobo--all depending on your tolerance for heat. If you remove the seeds and membrane inside, jalapenos are pretty tame. You might want to consider using black beans instead of red.

 

In either version, tomatoes would be a nice addition. I'd use canned.

 

Just a thought, but I make a pork and hominy stew with bacon, tomatoes, cumin, cilantro, lime, etc. which uses a bottle of amber or dark beer as part of the liquid. It would probably work with beans, too.

 

I know you said you are looking for a salt substitute but beans typically need a healthy dose of salt to have much flavor.

 

I've never made Louisiana style red beans and rice, and I'm not sure if that's what you're after, but I'm sure someone else will have ideas about that, if that's the direction you want to take things.

post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoTerry View Post

For a pound of beans I'd probably use at least 4 and probably 5 or 6 large cloves of minced garlic and I'd double the onions. IMO, beans need a LOT of aromatics to make them delicious.

If you are sticking with the thyme, I would skip the cilantro and go with fresh parsley. Dried parsley is flavorless. I probably would have skipped the cumin, too, with thyme as an ingredient. They don't strike me as complementary flavors.

If you want to go with cilantro, cumin and lime juice are commonly used with cilantro. Don't be shy about quantities of any of the three. You could throw a couple finely chopped jalapenos in there, too. Or chipotles in adobo, adding some of the adobo--all depending on your tolerance for heat. If you remove the seeds and membrane inside, jalapenos are pretty tame. You might want to consider using black beans instead of red.

In either version, tomatoes would be a nice addition. I'd use canned.

Just a thought, but I make a pork and hominy stew with bacon, tomatoes, cumin, cilantro, lime, etc. which uses a bottle of amber or dark beer as part of the liquid. It would probably work with beans, too.

I know you said you are looking for a salt substitute but beans typically need a healthy dose of salt to have much flavor.

I've never made Louisiana style red beans and rice, and I'm not sure if that's what you're after, but I'm sure someone else will have ideas about that, if that's the direction you want to take things.

The recipe which was the basis for the one I did added a Creole seasoning (Tony Chachere's). I was trying to stay somewhat within the idea of a Louisiana syle but lose the multi-mixture of dried prepared herbs that one source provided. I subbed the red chilli, ground cyan pepper, fresh ground black pepper, ground cumin, thyme and salt for that one seasoning. Tony's doesn't list the herbs, and I'm not skilled in breaking down the flavors, so I muddled through. Ashamedly, I admit that Carla Hall's elimination from Top Chef played on my mind!

PS--the recipe called for one crushed garlic clove!
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
Perhaps this recipe doesn't look 'focused' to some. My intent was to do a variation on a Cajun recipe. What could I do to maintain Cajun integrity, keep the red chilli pepper (which I love!), and do without Tony Chachere?


Quote:
Originally Posted by DevelopingTaste View Post

The recipe which was the basis for the one I did added a Creole seasoning (Tony Chachere's). I was trying to stay somewhat within the idea of a Louisiana syle but lose the multi-mixture of dried prepared herbs that one source provided. I subbed the red chilli, ground cyan pepper, fresh ground black pepper, ground cumin, thyme and salt for that one seasoning. Tony's doesn't list the herbs, and I'm not skilled in breaking down the flavors, so I muddled through. Ashamedly, I admit that Carla Hall's elimination from Top Chef played on my mind!

PS--the recipe called for one crushed garlic clove!
post #20 of 21

Celery seed is a good salt substitute.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #21 of 21

Google "creole seasoning recipe" or "cajun seasoning recipe" and you will get lots of results.

 

Most have salt, paprika, cayenne, black pepper, onion powder, garlic powder, thyme, oregano and sometimes other things which vary according to the recipe.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › In the middle of cooking red beans, and am looking for a salt sub...