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Help with a fishcake recipe

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I'd like some help with a fishcake recipe I'm working on.  We recently went to a restaurant and had an appetizer called codfish brandade croquettes.  They were made with bacalao, were shaped into balls and deep fried and then served with a roasted red pepper coulis.  It was delicious and gave me an idea to make codcakes with bacalao but I'm not sure how to go about it.  I have the fish desalting so it should be ready by tomorrow evening. 

 

The flavors I want to incorporate are sauteed leeks, dill, and maybe roasted red pepper.  I want to make them into little patties that I can bread and shallow fry and serve with skordalia.  So here's where I'm stumped.

 

- Do I cook the bacalao first and then shred or do I shred it before it's cooked.

- How do I shred the bacalao, should I put it in a food processor or do it by knife in hand?

- Do I use egg as a binder?  Do I have to put flour in the mixture too?  What else should go in the mixture?

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #2 of 14

An interesting take on the Brandade....making it into Croquettes............

I may use that idea myself at work....LOL

 

Take your fish (raw) and cut it up into small 1" chunks and use the food processor.

Coarsely chop your leeks and saute them in butter and olive oil salt and pepper.

 

Oil, roast, cool, peel and seed your bell peppers. Will you be incorporating this into the cakes or as a sauce for presentation?

 

For the cakes, place your fish, your sauteed leeks, the dill, and  salt and pepper, in a food processor.....

If you intend on adding the bell peppers, use them sparingly as they can overpower the delicate fish flavors.

You'll be adding egg whites, THEN heavy cream to get the consistency you want for the cakes.

The amount depends on how much fish.........

For 4 cakes as an example, you'd need less than one egg white and a few teaspoons of heavy cream.

You're basically making a fish "mousse" here.

The consistency has to lend itself to making patties to bread and not loose enough where it would be something like a "Quenelle" or fish ball to be poached in stock or water.

I'd consider Panko breading for a more crispy cake.

 

Another idea would be to cook the fish, leeks, bell peppers, process this and , add it to a very thick cooked and cooled white sauce. Refrigerate, shape into whatever, bread and go from there.

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks that helps a lot.  I wonder if I can do it without incorporating the cream. 

 

The red pepper coulis that was served with it was amazing, but I'm looking to serve this as a spin on a traditional greek dish on an upcoming holiday and I just now that if I served a red pepper sauce it would go untouched.  That's why I want to incorporate the red pepper inside the fishcake so it can't be ignored.  Instead I will serve it with the traditional skordalia.

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #4 of 14

In the method put forth by Chefross - the heavy cream is used to 'loosen' the mixture and add some fat.  You could substitute almost any other liquid, but you will want to keep the same fat ratio that the cream adds.

 

Why don't you want the cream? It is a rather very small amount.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

The reason I don't want the cream (or the egg) is that this dish is made during orthodox Lent.  It is an exception that day that we eat fish, but must abstain from all other animal products.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 14

ah....  

 

I should have seen that one... duh!

 

(i'm not always the sharpest marshmallow in the bag!)

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #7 of 14

The real original Fish cakes were made from dried cod .  it was reconstituted mixed with mashed potatoes and an egg or 2 some seasoning then either shallow r deep fried. When I was a kid we ate them quit a bit during Lent and on Fridays.  Grandma and mom made them same way as did most folk in New York . They were easy, cheap and good.  A croquette on the other han was a heavy becahamel , mixed with fish and hyerbs and onion, scallion or chive. Formed into a pyramid type shape chilled,  floured , egged and breaded then deep fried. The croquette is a bit lighter in consistancy. Fanny Farmer and Joy of cooking books have both recipes.

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post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

Ed, is dried cod the same thing as salted cod?

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

I made the fishcakes yesterday.  I sweated the leeks in olive oil and butter until very soft.  Then mixed them in with the bacalao, along with finely chopped dill, parsley, scallion, and roasted red peppers from a jar.  I included one egg white and a little milk.  Patted with some panko and shallow fried in olive oil.  Then served with warm skordalia.

 

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I need to take a photography course and get a better camera.

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 14

Fat is to hot.

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post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the kind feedback.  I've never been very good at frying.

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #12 of 14

Check out Ellie Krieger's crab cake recipe - it does use one egg, but there is probably a work around for that. They are baked not fried and come out crisp like fried.

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

Mike I looked up Krieger's recipe and it gave me the idea to bake instead of fry.  I really hate frying - I love fried food by I really hate standing around frying at the stove.  I had a couple of codcakes left so I brushed them with olive oil and coated 1 with panko and the other with regular breadcrumbs.  The top of the one with regular breadcrumbs came out golden and crispy.  The one with panko still looked pale but tasted better than the one with regular breadcrumbs.  Both stuck to the sheet pan.  I didn't think to use parchment paper.  The ones that were fried were much better in flavor although they didn't look as pretty.  But the process of baking was more pleasant. 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #14 of 14

Thats because Panko contains more moisture and is a goarser grating.

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