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Tinned Fruit Syrup

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hey guys. So I love tinned fruit. It's not the best, but the thing I love most is the syrup that it sits in.

Does anyone know how to make this? Or something similar? 

post #2 of 12

It's just a simple syrup poured over the fruit while the syrup is hot. You can play with the ratios of sugar to water to make the syrup lighter or heavier.

 

http://www.canning-food-recipes.com/canningfruits.htm#Syrup

post #3 of 12

The syrup is a simple syrup one pours over the cut up raw fruit before the jar or tin is sealed and processed.  Generally fruits are processed in a water bath.  I have not used tins because for a single canner, the $$$ outlay is usually out of line so re-usable jars are used.  This is a process that needs to be googled and a trusted site with instructions for a home canner. The simple syrup that I use is a 2 to one--two parts water to one part sugar.  For heavy syrup one to one, one part water, one part sugar.  It's not a process that a novice can do without a knowledge of canning and some special equipment--large enough cooking pan to sit a jar or can in and sufficient room to cover the sitting jar/jars with water and room above the lidded jar to one inch above it.  The water is then boiled for a sufficient time to fully cook the product and kill bacteria.  Tools to take the jars out of the water and padded area to allow the the jars to cool and create a seal. The lids are of a special kind as well.  Any canning supply store/website will have instructions and equipment.  Believe me home canned fruit is superior in flavor to the store brands, but if you're looking for attractive, perfect looking fruit, go with store bought.

 

Rue.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies guys. I wasn't really asking about tinning it, as I have no need to tin items.

If I were going to do something like that, I would use a pressure canner.

 

Thanks for the syrup too, guys. I may have to try it out sometime soon. :D

post #5 of 12

Simple syrup is handy to have on hand for a multitude of purposes and is VERY easy to make.
 

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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Yeah, I know how to make a simple syrup (I think).

My basic knowledge is just equal parts sugar and water, boil, reduce heat and simmer?

My only problem is I'm not too sure how long to simmer it for, to get the right consistency?

post #7 of 12

You don't need to actually boil simple syrup.  Just put the sugar in cold water and get it hot enough for the the sugar to completely dissolve.  At simple syrup ratios of 1 or 2 volumes of sugar per volume of water (low molarity), hot enough to brew tea is hot enough to make simple syrup.  However, dissolving the sugar in boiling water means it will dissolve completely more quickly and will not precipitate out later. 

 

No need for protracted simmering. 

 

No need to reduce. 

 

Instead of reduction, if you want more concentration simply use more sugar (or less water).  You can get a more viscous flow by reducing, but (a) that's not simple syrup, and (b) highly reduced sugar water doesn't taste very good.  If you're looking for something with a slower flow and more body, try starting with honey, molasses, corn syrup, "golden syrup,"  or treacle, and thinning as necessary. 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 3/2/13 at 11:31am
post #8 of 12

I love those citrus fruit things you get in the refrigerator section of supermarkets in the states made of oranges, grapefruits and pineapple in a light syrup..  There are some thyat are actually fresh fruit, not canned. 

 

Anyway, i make a similar thing (that of course is much better since it's fresh)- i peel the fruit with a big chef's knife, on a cutting board taking off all the white with the skin, then just roughly chop through cutting across the sections..  I cut up the grapefruit.  I put it all in a bowl and use a somewhat reduced syrup (it may just be an illusion but i think that it sort of tastes a little caramelized, though it's barely colored if at all.  I pour it over the fruit while it's hot, and the pineapple (which is often not quite ripe enough) seems to exude its own juice when it meets the hot syrup and the same the other fruit, and so the syrup ends up being much lighter (gets mixed with a lot of juice of the fruits) and the fruit tastes more ripe.   (Basically you're cooking just a thin outer layer of fruit, the rest, the majority of it, remains fresh.

 

I also deal with excess peaches and nectarines when they get overripe by cutting off the brown parts and treating them to the same treatment.  I just pour the hot syrup over them (no heating the fruit) and they let off some of their own juice.  .  I also love that taste, and of course if you do it at home it's ten times better. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #9 of 12

There are 2 kinds  of pre peeled citrus supremes available  Hot Pack and Cold Pack  cold is superior

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post #10 of 12

Yeah, the cold pack is special.  That's what i try to copy.  Mine is great, but it would also be very nice to be able to just go and buy it once in a while. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #11 of 12

Notice how the two are peeled  .Cold pack cut from between membrane. Hot pack with membrane in center of supreme so it wont fall apart.

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post #12 of 12

Ed, i do it for my own personal use and have no time for peeling off membranes.  They never bothered me.  So i just cut through the peeled orange crosswise and any which way, so at least what is exposed is not the peel and the juice can flow. 

I always make this at a brunch when i have pancakes, bacon, eggs, cinnamon raisin rolls etc, because it feels refreshing on the tongue after (or with) all those heavy things.  But i often make it just to take to work for a nice refreshing break. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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