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Making ice cream.

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hey guys. I recently purchased an ice cream machine. I made a batch of vanilla bean, and it was so nice.

But after being in the freezer for overnight, it turned incredibly icy, while still good.

I did it all to instruction, I froze the bowl til solid, and I simmered the custard until it coated the spoon.

 

What recipes do you guys use? And how do you avoid your ice cream being icy?

post #2 of 12

It might be easier to figure out what's going on with your situationif you tell what you did, what recipe you used, and what equipment you used.  There are many factors that could contribute to the icyness.

 

In terms of recipes... any of the gelato recipes in Batali's books are both foolproof, relatively easy, and very tasty.

post #3 of 12

... and here is a good basic illustrated tutoriral:

 

http://www.joepastry.com/category/pastry-components/ice-cream/

 

(Leave a comment and tell Joe I sent you).  :)

post #4 of 12

As previously stated, it could be due to any of a number of issues, but without knowing your recipe and technique, hard to pinpoint and offer assistance.  Personally, I like "Jeni's" ice cream recipes, they are non-egg based, but super creamy and decadent!  In her book, she discusses several ingredient choices and techniques all to reduce the possibility of iciness.  It is all based on good food science.

post #5 of 12

Definitely need to know the recipe.

 

As long as the recipe has enough fat in it, I've never had a problem with iciness, especially within the first 24 hours or so. And I find that egg-based, cooked custard recipes last even longer without getting icy. However, most homemade ice creams do tend to freeze very hard. Harder than, say, the average carton of Hagan Das. You just have to let it soften for 10 minutes or so before scooping it out and eating it.

 

One thing that can help reduce iciness is a tablespoon or two of vodka in the mix. It's undetectable in fruit flavors and it can really help with fruit sorbets, where there isn't any fat. Not sure how it would be with vanilla, though.

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

I used 6 egg yolks, 140g caster sugar, whisked until thick and pale.

375ml Milk, 375m Pouring (Whipping) cream and a vanilla bean.

Brought the milk, cream and vanilla up to a boil, and took it off heat for a few minutes to infuse, then removed the vanilla bean.

Then whisked the cream and milk into the egg yolks, once fully incorporated, poured it all into a clean saucepan, then simmered gently for 20 minutes stirring every minute.

I let it sit for about 15 minutes off heat, then into a medium bowl into the fridge with cling wrap on top of the custard to stop a skin.

Then into my churner (which had been freezing for about 6 hours, it was frozen) for 40 minutes, then into a metal loaf tin in the freezer.

post #7 of 12

I looks like you have enough fat in the mix to bind with water from the dairy.  My guess would be in the churning or that the custard is not thoroughly chilled before churning.  I use a cuisinart ice-30 for which the freezer bowl spends at least overnight in the deep freeze (-10).  It never takes 40 minutes.  Typically 20-25 minutes.  From what I have read, the speed of going from liquid to solid can greatly affect the size of the crystals formed (faster is better).

 

I would try chilling the custard overnight in the fridge and the bowl in the freezer, see if it doesn't take a lot shorter time to get to the "soft-serve" consistency.  Also, after churning, when you are done filling your container, try covering the top with parchment or freezer paper, this will reduce air contact which can result in surface crystallization (and then lower the paper after each serving so that the paper is in contact prior to storage in the freezer).
 

post #8 of 12

Most of the recipes I use have 2 parts heavy cream to 1 part milk or half and half. Milk gets icier than cream does.

 

You have to let the custard get really cold before you pour it into the bowl.

 

The bowl should also be frozen for at least 24 hours before using and, unless you are freezing a ton of ice cream, it shouldn't take 40 minutes to freeze. More like 20- 25 minutes. Half hour at the outside, and that's for a bigger batch than should probably be in your bowl to begin with. It should have the consistency of soft serve ice cream when it is ready to go into the freezer.

 

I'm a little suspicious of that loaf pan. I usually pack mine into a compact, closed container to finish freezing. You use an open, flat container and expose a lot of the surface to the freezer for granitas, where you kind of want an icy texture.

 

That's all I can think of. I'm sure people with a lot more skill than I have will have ideas, too.

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoTerry View Post

Most of the recipes I use have 2 parts heavy cream to 1 part milk or half and half. Milk gets icier than cream does.

 

You have to let the custard get really cold before you pour it into the bowl.

 

The bowl should also be frozen for at least 24 hours before using and, unless you are freezing a ton of ice cream, it shouldn't take 40 minutes to freeze. More like 20- 25 minutes. Half hour at the outside, and that's for a bigger batch than should probably be in your bowl to begin with. It should have the consistency of soft serve ice cream when it is ready to go into the freezer.

 

I'm a little suspicious of that loaf pan. I usually pack mine into a compact, closed container to finish freezing. You use an open, flat container and expose a lot of the surface to the freezer for granitas, where you kind of want an icy texture.

 

That's all I can think of. I'm sure people with a lot more skill than I have will have ideas, too.


Ha ha, are you my long lost twin separated at birth?

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoTerry View Post

The bowl should also be frozen for at least 24 hours before using and, unless you are freezing a ton of ice cream, it shouldn't take 40 minutes to freeze. More like 20- 25 minutes.

 

I think this is it.

post #11 of 12

I'd also avoid freezing it in a metal dish. That's just inviting ice crystals to form.

post #12 of 12

I've noticed that my mom's ice cream made in her "freeze the bowl" ice cream maker gets icy when frozen.  Don't like it as well as good old fashioned churns that use ice and salt.  I also don't particularly like the taste of custard ice creams....I'm picky.  I grew up with old fashioned ice cream made from raw eggs, cream, milk, sugar and vanilla.  Churned in a huge 2 gal freezer that we kids had to sit on while the grown up turned the wheel.  If you decide to try a churn, get a hand crank one as it will let you make the ice cream more solid to begin with.  Homemade ice cream will get much harder than store bought.  The ice crystals form from water in the mix....which means everything has to be really cold when put in to freeze or you create some "steam" that will form ice crystals.

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