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Diamond or titanium?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

What makes the best cooking surface, diamond or titanium?

I am trying to decide what kind of pan to buy, diamond or titanium. Probably will buy Woll.
 
Which surface is best overall in terms of being durable, nonstick, able to withstand high heat and PFOA safe, and making the best food? I don't care so much about "hardness." I know diamond is harder.
 
Thank you.
post #2 of 8

The best cooking surface is a question loaded with assumptions. IMHO, neither of those is particularly good for a cooking surface, but that is a reflection of how and what I like to cook. 

 

But the question is what do you like to cook? That will guide us to what material/surface is best for your cooking.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

That's interesting. Have you personally used either one of these to cook with? I was of the understanding that Chef Gordon Ramsey uses the Woll Titanium pan so I assumed it must have something going for it. Plus, Woll titanium pans get outstanding 5-star reviews at Amazon, with Woll diamond pans lagging only a little behind.

 

I like to cook everything! 

 

I am looking for a nonstick pan that can withstand high heat safely, go into the oven, and produce great results. Until now I have only used Teflon as far as nonstick pans go, and I would like a better alternative without the drawbacks of Teflon.


Edited by leswhaley - 3/26/13 at 1:29pm
post #4 of 8

What chef's use on TV is most often what they get sponsored to use. Read the credits and you'll see.

 

Nonstick has it's place, but most serious cooks would choose it only for a limited selection of items. Non stick works by repelling water and tends to steam the surface of foods. This means it doesn't produce the sear and Browning/Mailliard reactions you want when you brown foods.  Non-stick doesn't produce fond for pan sauces. When you properly prepare a burger, steak or vegetables in plain metal pans, they mostly release themselves from the cooking surface. It's one of the key clues to knowing when to turn food is that it's not really sticking any more.

 

Eggs and fish are the primary foods cooks prefer non-stick for. 

 

Remember, non-stick first claim to fame was easy cleanup. Not particularly good food results. This really hasn't changed, but has become noted for those delicate foods where sticking is particularly troublesome, fish and eggs.

 

Titanium is an OK conductor of heat, about like Aluminum. The hard anodize makes it non-reactive but after that, it doesn't really offer anything clad stainless steel doesn't. It's not non-stick. Anodize has fussier care requirements too.

 

I agree, I want my pans to be able to go into the oven. All that means is a metal handle is best. The stay cool handle is the limiting factor, not the pan material The Woll handles can't withstand the broiler for example.

 

I cook on a range of materials. Carbon steel, cast iron, clad stainless, non-stick. I  choose a pan based on what I'm cooking. If I had to choose just one type, clad stainless is the most versatile imho.

 

Oh, and one of my personal requirements is that any new cookware has to be induction compatible. Induction is an amazing heat source.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Your post is interesting, but I would like the opinion of someone who has used both diamond and titanium pans (preferably the Woll brand) and can tell me what they have had better experience with. Because I'm going to be buying one of the two, or both. According to Amazon users, nothing ever sticks to titanium.

post #6 of 8

I haven't used diamond. I've used anodized titanium and thought it was nothing special, and more hassle.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 8

I've only been a serious home cook for 25-30 years, but I've never heard the term "diamond" or "titanium"  applied to cookware before. Do these have any meaning, or are they just brand names?

 

I know that titanium is the metal applied as the covering for the SR-21 Blackbird spy plane, but if I'm not planning to fry something while going  more than 2,000 miles per hour, why would I need a pan made out of it?

 

Thanks

 

Mike
 

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #8 of 8

Titanium is very similar in cooking performance to Aluminum, but lighter. It shows up in backpacking cookware a fair amount now, usually hard anodized. In my opinion, the hard anodize of titanium is more durable than Aluminum, but I've no hard data to back that up.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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