or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

a good egg

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

are all eggs the same or are some better than others ?

post #2 of 24

Eggs that were under a hen that morning are SO much better than store bought.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 

thinking about it , i should get a couple of chickens smile.gif

post #4 of 24

I have 8 Buff Orpington Hens that give me 8 eggs a day, on most days. The hens just started laying, these eggs are pullet eggs. I find the whites are real clear and the yokes are rich and creamy. I will never go back to store bought eggs, we will also be free ranging our chickens this summer......................I believe this info I just gave you to be true, it is no yoke............Chefbillyb

post #5 of 24

When we lived in farmland in Tasmania, there was a chicken farm nearby, free-range, where you could just pop in to get them, or at the local sunday farmer's market.  The colour of the yolk was gorgous, not like the insipid store bought caged eggs.  And lots of double yolkers too.  The taste and freshness of these eggs was superb.

 

Now we've moved to a larger city on the big island, and these sort of eggs are not easily available.  The stores label the as free range, but I think sometimes that's far from the truth.  More work needs to be done on regulations.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #6 of 24

Free range, organic eggs only.

 

i have often observed that Americans seem to favour white shelled eggs, whilst here in the UK, it's brown!

post #7 of 24

From : The Egg Nutrition Center   

 

"The color difference is due to the specific breed of hen. Hens with white feathers and white earlobes will lay white eggs, whereas hens with red feathers and matching-colored earlobes give us brown eggs."  There is no nutritional difference.

post #8 of 24

TY!smile.gif


Edited by Burnie - 3/28/13 at 10:35am
post #9 of 24

I don't eat a lot of eggs, but when I do, they come from a local farm- free range- the eggs are often still warm when I buy them.

post #10 of 24

How long do you guys and gals leave your farm fresh eggs out on the counter................

post #11 of 24

As I learned while working on a farm as a kid in Massachusetts....

 

"Brown eggs are local eggs, and local are eggs are fresh"

post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post

How long do you guys and gals leave your farm fresh eggs out on the counter................

They usually don't last long enough for time on the counter to be a concern.

post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnie View Post

From : The Egg Nutrition Center   

 

"The color difference is due to the specific breed of hen. Hens with white feathers and white earlobes will lay white eggs, whereas hens with red feathers and matching-colored earlobes give us brown eggs."  There is no nutritional difference.

Errrrm

 

i don't believe I suggested any nutritional difference, merely a preference in shell colour.

post #14 of 24

This might be a stupid question but why do you not hear of anybody eating goose eggs? Are they no good?
 

post #15 of 24
Too much gold
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomago View Post

This might be a stupid question but why do you not hear of anybody eating goose eggs? Are they no good?

Having worked on a farm, the goose egg is bitter. I'd eat it if I were starving, but then again I'd eat a whole goose if I were starving.

How about we agree that you don't murder an innocent goose out of some sick exotic dream of yours. Eat chicken and turkey. Be happy
 
post #17 of 24

I just ate cassoulet with goose confit: absolutely délicious!! Better than duck confit!!!

post #18 of 24

In  Mexican mercados eggs are sold not refrigerated..even in Walmart...

 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #19 of 24

Around here in Germany, eggs are sold unrefrigerated, too. From my point of view as a biochemist: The main purpose of an egg is not to be eaten, but to provide a safe space and the necessary nutrients for a chicken to hatch. Bacterial growth would interfere with that. For that reason, eggs have defenses against bacterial growth, e.g. enzymes like lysozyme. Those actually work better at higher temperature, so refrigerating eggs would be counterproductive. 

 

I get my eggs from my neighbour. They have a huge yard to scratch and pick for insects and stuff and get additional kitchen scraps and grains or whatever is at hand. As dutch oven said, they don't last long enough that time on the counter is a problem :D

 

As for color - shell color makes no difference in taste, but if you compare my neighbours eggs with supermarket stuff, you'll notice quite some difference in yolk color and in the density of the yolk. And that goes with taste difference.

post #20 of 24

In America we wash our eggs. This rinses away the protective bacteria on the egg so now they are perishable and must be refrigerated.

post #21 of 24

Eggs are not refrigerated in UK supermarkets, but lots of people I know refrigerate them the minute they get home!  I live in an old house, with a walk-in pantry, which keeps everything cool.  I keep eggs in there.

post #22 of 24

Well, that's where my eggs come from. Say hello to the ladies:

 

 

post #23 of 24

Of course, occasionally they break loose - that's my dear girlfriend on chicken patrol:

 

 

post #24 of 24

Unwashed eggs that have never been refrigerated can actually last up to a year.  Don't know that I'd want to try it, but that's what I've heard.  You can check your eggs by putting them in enough water to cover them....if they completely float, don't eat them.  If they stand on end, get them used ASAP.  Always (always) store your eggs in the carton with the pointy end down.  Can't remember why but it has something to do with how long you can keep them.  You can now buy brown eggs in the store in the US.  Most of those that I've seen are labeled free-range.  Free range qualifications are that the chickens have to have x number of hours in the open air each day....not necessarily "free range" like my chickens.  My chickens usually are turned out in the morning and go back to the chicken house at night.  They have access to the manure piles, to the compost pile, etc.  They are locked up right now because I've got some areas I wanted to plant seed and they will eat every last seed out there if they get a chance.  

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking