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Easter Bunny!

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

My first thread...please be kind...

It's a tradition in our house to have bunny (or, more aptly "coniglio cacciatore en bianco") for Easter...

 

The table is set:



 

 

MANGIA!!!



 

 

 

post #2 of 17

That looks fantastic.

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dutch oven View Post

That looks fantastic.

Thank you - that's the last time HE'll be rummaging through my backyard vegetable garden! tongue.gif

 

(I kid, I kid..."he" was purchased at the stellar Ottomanelli's meat market, here in NYC)

post #4 of 17

just lovely

post #5 of 17

Where do you buy rabbit?

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gladys Kravitz View Post

Where do you buy rabbit?

Ottomanelli's meats, on Bleecker Street!

I am blessed to live where I do!

post #7 of 17

How do you know it's fresh?  It's not like I partake in bunny eating very often.  Thx.

post #8 of 17

I used to eat a lot of rabbit in college when I was a small game assassin.  Tasty stuff when prepared correctly.

 

Home Plate- you'res is michelin star quality by the look of it.

post #9 of 17
Is it so sheeny because of a demi glaze or is that the fatty juices glistening in your dining room?
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSoupNazi View Post

Is it so sheeny because of a demi glaze or is that the fatty juices glistening in your dining room?
Those pictures are great
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomago View Post




 
One of my favs
post #12 of 17

Beautiful. I remember having seen a coniglio alla cacciatora in a tuscan cookbook that may or may not be still around here somewhere... My library is a mess. Do I remember correctly that it is marinaded in white whine?

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneMachine View Post

Beautiful. I remember having seen a coniglio alla cacciatora in a tuscan cookbook that may or may not be still around here somewhere... My library is a mess. Do I remember correctly that it is marinaded in white whine?

There's no marinating in the recipe above... The rabbit pieces are soaked in 4 cups cold water/3 tablespoons red wine vinegar for one hour, to tenderize and reduce gaminess.

 

Other than that, the ingredients are pretty simple - 4 tablespoons olive oil; 4 cloves finely chopped garlic mixed together with a tablespoon or two chopped fresh rosemary; salt and pepper to taste; 1 cup white wine added in two 1/2 cup increments; 1 cup chicken, duck, or rabbit stock.

 

Immediately prior to serving, garnish with 2 cloves finely chopped RAW garlic, and 20 or so parsley leaves...  The raw garlic adds a nice bite to the meal. 

post #14 of 17

Thanks - gotta give it a try. Guess that's the difference between cacciatore and cacciaotra - the hunter does not as the huntress does :D

post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneMachine View Post

Thanks - gotta give it a try. Guess that's the difference between cacciatore and cacciaotra - the hunter does not as the huntress does :D

smile.gif


Keep in mind that the above is a braising technique...the first twenty minutes or so, as you're searing the meat to a slight golden color in the oil, then adding the garlic/rosemary mixture, salt and pepper are "dry" cooking. The first 1/2 cup of wine is then added, and cooked for about 5-8 minutes...finally, the remaining wine is added, as is a little bit of stock...the pot or casserole is COVERED, and incremental additions of stock are made as needed, cooking for another 45 minutes or so, or until the meat is golden brown, and tender.


 

post #16 of 17

That looks good I'm going to try that - I love rabbit and will raise some for meat when I retire next year.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Home Plate View Post

smile.gif

Keep in mind that the above is a braising technique...the first twenty minutes or so, as you're searing the meat to a slight golden color in the oil, then adding the garlic/rosemary mixture, salt and pepper are "dry" cooking. The first 1/2 cup of wine is then added, and cooked for about 5-8 minutes...finally, the remaining wine is added, as is a little bit of stock...the pot or casserole is COVERED, and incremental additions of stock are made as needed, cooking for another 45 minutes or so, or until the meat is golden brown, and tender.



 
Wow home... that's a lot of work but the result is obviously worth it
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