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Dry Peeling Hands

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Ok I've been in restuaurants for about ten years and I've heard that gloves dry out certain people's hands. Well after ten years i always laughed at the subject but out of no where my hands are starting to become extremely dry from the latex gloves I wear at work. What's a good remedy to moisten the hands after work?

post #2 of 16
Are you forced to wear the latex gloves?I think they are good for a few tasks but I don't really like them........they create a false sense of security when it comes to cross contamination.Instead of washing their hands after every job people somehow think that these gloves are some magic barrier and will leave them on for hours at a time.I've walked into QSR's and left without ordering because of the stained latex gloves the staff were wearing.I'm sure any decent quality drug store hand lotion will do the trick.
post #3 of 16

I use Corn Huskers Lotion.

Others swear by Bag Balm, but it's too greasy for me.

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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 

im not forced to wear gloves but I do change them frequently. I like to wear them when I'm on fry since it's faster to change a pair than to wash your hands after handling chicken or other proteins or if your hands just become full on gunky wet flour. I've been using Aveeno so hopefully they'll clear up soon. I didn't use gloves today in attempt to clear my hands up. 

post #5 of 16

I second bag balm. My hubby swears by it. They use it to moisturizer cow udders.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #6 of 16

I use Gold Bond Ultimate Healing. Keep a tube in the car, lube up on the way home, keep one on the table next to my chair so I'll remember to apply it while watching the idiot box.

Bag Balm is too graesy for me too....I use it on my dog's nose and takes forever to get it worked in.

post #7 of 16

Aquaphor is really great. If you want to clear it up within hours do this: Before going to bed, grease up your hands with Aquaphor and put on a pair of white cotton gloves. 

My son and husband have this problem frequently and do the glove thing at night with great success.

We call them "Magic Sleeping Gloves"

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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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post #8 of 16

Your answer may be as simple as changing the type of gloves you use.

Switch to a non-latex powder free type.

More $$ but worth it IMO as the stage after dry is chapped and peeling and sometimes even bleeding.

If the owner won't pony up, would be worth it to buy your own.

* I thought latex had been banned in the kitchen due to so many customer allergies?

 

mimi

post #9 of 16
If you're using them because you're on the fryers what about those cheap single use non-latex gloves .....the type they use at Subway?
post #10 of 16

Try rubbing hands with a piece of beef fat. works every time for me.

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post #11 of 16

It puts the lotion on it's skin or it gets the Hose Again  !!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boooo Haaaaaaa 

 

 

Just jokes try unpowdered gloves 

My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

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My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

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post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

I guess it's my chemistry changing and my skin isn't what it used to be. My hands are clearing up and I haven't used gloves about three days now. I'll keep all the suggestions in mind. Thanks everyone.

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodnfoto View Post

Aquaphor is really great. If you want to clear it up within hours do this: Before going to bed, grease up your hands with Aquaphor and put on a pair of white cotton gloves. 

My son and husband have this problem frequently and do the glove thing at night with great success.

We call them "Magic Sleeping Gloves"

I use Aquaphor on new tattoos.

Besides Aquaphor ( a medicated gel) Eucerin makes many great products.

I use their moisturizing lotion when I don't have corn huskers lotion.

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #14 of 16

I use gloves all day and find that Gold Bond Ultimate healing BEFORE I put on the gloves keep them moist during the day. 
The Bag Balm I find greasy and it doesnt heal it just moisturizes.

If my hands get REALLY bad and start to crack and bleed at night I will use Utter Cream or Lanolin and wear gloves.  I wake up in the morning and they are like new.

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #15 of 16

I am really against the use of gloves in food production. I have seen way to much cross contamination by people wearing gloves when simple hand washing would have happened because they know there hands are dirty. Do any of you use gloves at home for food prep? IMO gloves have become popular for the visual affect of safety they provide the customer but if you are observant just watch how much cross contamination occurs by the people wearing them. In all of my kitchens I preach and practice hand washing and sanitation buckets and have yet to have a incident of food born illness reported in over 30 years in the biz.
 

The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
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The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
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post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboy2160 View Post

I am really against the use of gloves in food production. I have seen way to much cross contamination by people wearing gloves when simple hand washing would have happened because they know there hands are dirty. Do any of you use gloves at home for food prep? IMO gloves have become popular for the visual affect of safety they provide the customer but if you are observant just watch how much cross contamination occurs by the people wearing them. In all of my kitchens I preach and practice hand washing and sanitation buckets and have yet to have a incident of food born illness reported in over 30 years in the biz.
 

I have seen that too, from experienced chefs no less.

Wearing one set of gloves for hours, across multiple tasks.

I wear them when reaching in to liquids, like moving product in a brine, or when I am prepping chicken.

I might go through 5 or more pair on a single task.

Like any tool, they have their place, but can easily be abused.

Used properly and in conjunction with hand washing and sanitizer buckets (which I've also seen abused by never being changed out), they are just one more barrier against contamination.

And yes, I wear gloves at home when breaking down chicken.

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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