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Role of wine in making Rissotto

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I enjoy making rissottos of one flavour or another but I have a question about making it.

What role does the inclusion of wine have? and is there another product that could be used in its place?

I have heard that Vermouth can be used but it still poses the same problem.

I don't always have wine open or available every time I want to make rissotto, I do freeze leftover 1/2 cups of wine, to have some available, but I don't feel happy using wine in dishes when feeding the grandchildren.

Help? Please.

post #2 of 8

Wine is added to risotto first as a flavor additive. To that end,,,,you could you could add anything or nothing at all but stock.

post #3 of 8

I use vermouth instead.  It keeps better and I don't always have an open bottle of wine laying around.  I prefer the taste of vermouth anyway.  I don't hesitate to feed my toddler son anything I make with wine because most if not all the alcohol burns off during cooking, it's not a significant amount of alcohol anyway.  But if it makes you uncomfortable just skip that step and go straight to stock.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #4 of 8

I can't imagine any more than trace amounts of alcohol left as the rice is cooked down almost completely dry after the addition of the wine.  Also, vacuum packed boxed wine has an excellent shelf life even after opened.  I keep a box around just for cooking with (and the occasional white sangria).

post #5 of 8

Us "Eye-talians" have been cooking with wine for centuries. I don't think it has had any ill effects on children. Personally, I would not worry about it.

post #6 of 8

my old neighbor was an eye-talian, his  whole back yard full of concrete statues and one gallon plastic olive oil containers. i could never figure out why he was saving them

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for the information you folks have provided.

I always beleived that the wine used was to acidify the rice, to open it up so it absorbed the stock in a more timely manner.

Food rules around feeding children have changed so much since my children were little and the "food police" seem to be on everything.

So I get worried whenever I have the grandkids over for a meal. Hence the worry about the wine in the risotto.

Also thanks folks for not being "grammer police' cna't believe I have continued to spell Risotto incorrectly so many times.

That's what comes of typing around a pushy cat and lack of coffee. She seems to think my desk and keyboard are hers for the lounging. Aand as we all know Coffee is such a marvelous brain saver. >grin<

post #8 of 8

I know all about the food police, I am the food police!  Sometimes grandparents do get out of line with certain things because certain conditions did not seem to exist when we were young.  Nowadays there are all these guidelines for parents on what to feed children first and what to avoid.  I've seen grandmothers want to give chocolate to a 4month old baby!  That's really not good.  But if a child is old enough to be eating risotto, they're old enough to eat it properly and you can rest assured that your grandchild will be drunk so no worries.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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