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Stay Away From Le Cordon Bleu (Pasadena, CA)

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

If you are living in the surrounding Los Angeles area,considering Le Cordon Bleu might be on your list of culinary schools to look into. But allow me to share my story. There is a reason why this school is always undergoing law suits. No one is guaranteed to become a high end chef without the years of hard work, sweat, knowledge attained, determination, persistence, and the adament drive.. and it would be stupid to expect otherwise. And alumnis of this school don't get pissed because they don't become executive chef right out of culinary school. What students are always complaining about is the QUALITY of EVERYTHING they get from this school after spending $50K.

 

I have many things to share about this joke of a school. http://www.behgopa.com/2013/04/culinary-school-le-cordon-bleu-college.html

post #2 of 9

Spending money is never a guarantee of quality of product, nor is it necessarily a proportional equation of more money more quality. Research before spending seems to work for me.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 9

I'd be leary of any school which claims to teach you how to cook in nine months.

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

I agree with everything mentioned above, Cheflayne and Kuan. I am currently working in the industry, but when I enrolled in this school, I actually had no intentions of working in the professional kitchen. I was a foodie and wanted to pursue this little hobby of mine (cooking). And since I was on a leisurely pursuit, I didn’t stress over where the culinary training was going to lead me to in the industry.

 

The program was 15 months long (for an AOS in Culinary Arts). And it is ridiculous when students are led to believe that they will automatically be handed chef jobs to them right out of school. For me, the 15 months was a convenient length of time. I was unsure of making a commitment for a longer period, but it was long enough to gain a decent knowledge of food (or so I thought).

 

If I had been planning to go to school for career training, I would have chosen a more extensive, reputable program. Even though I was training on a hobbyist level, the education I had paid for was supposed to be professional training to help prepare students for the real kitchens. And it did a horrible job of doing so.

 

Talk to any alumni (with an ounce of intelligence) and they will tell you that this school is garbage.  

post #5 of 9

I know someone who teaches at one. And he is certainly not qualified . Worked in 1 place entire career. A joke he should attend school.

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

When spending $50k, one would expect top quality instructors…not people off the streets. That is how much the school cares about the students. I mean, there actually were SOME decent, reputable instructors there….those that knew what they were doing. But the problem lies within the program itself. They are just all about the numbers game. They don’t give a shit about students once they leave the school. They already have herds of new victims each term to deal with in that mad chaos that goes on, primarily in admissions.

post #7 of 9

I graduated from LCB Miami in March, 2006; I would not recommend anyone go to school because of one thing - it costs tens of thousands of dollars, and it's not like you couldn't just get the job without the education: I worked at the Ritz-Carlton in pastry, side-by-side with a woman they had transferred in to the pastry department from housekeeping!
Rather than spending the money for the education, just go get the job and be paid for learning - do not pay to learn.

Other than that, the competence of the instructors, it seems, is top-notch (they had a lot of people who had backgrounds in working in Ritz-Carlton, a pastry chef who worked at "Norman's" in Miami during its "rise", one chef who had been voted [I forget by whom] among the top 50 chefs in the world some years prior and the European-Asian instructor had just returned from a culinary adventure in Italy where he was picking up the finer points of Italian cooking [now that I think of it, he was probably writing it off as a business expense...]), so I'm not complaining about that.
The tools (various knives, etc.,) our money bought were the best I'd ever used.
We were given all the ingredients necessary to practice with.

I don't think I can really complain about the school, itself - I just don't think it is even necessary! I guarantee that girl from housekeeping didn't spend tens of thousands of dollars in education, but she landed the same job I did! She was being paid to learn; I paid to learn. I would never recommend anyone go to cooking school.

post #8 of 9

The way a lot of schools do it now to lower salaries and payroll is to higher recent grads to teach. Years ago this was unheard of. 

 

Again    KEEP IN MIND THEY EXIST TO MAKE A PROFIT. You are # 2

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #9 of 9

Having attended culinary school, both in America and Europe, I highly recommend that serious students attend culinary school in Europe. The education is superior, the curriculum is better, and the exposure is life changing. Yes, it is possible to apply your student loans to instruction overseas. BTW, it is about half the cost to attend culinary school in Europe, or at least it was when I did it.

 

Alternatively, if you are adamant about culinary school in the states go to CIA. Hands down one of the best culinary schools in the world. Albeit, one of the most expensive culinary schools.

 

Consumer TIP: Take a long hard look at the curriculum and training at the actual LCB in Paris. Then take a look at the LCB affiliated schools in this country. Do you see a disparity?

 

Lastly, while I was in culinary school I calculated the cost of school per hour of instruction. It is the most expensive education in the world. Medical school costs more in terms of total dollars spent but culinary school costs more, by a wide margin, in terms of dollars per hour.

 

No Regrets,

 

Madchef 

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