or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › Holding Pommes Puree for Service?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Holding Pommes Puree for Service?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Chef is doing a nice pommes puree for the next week under a braised lamb shoulder. Hate putting mashed in a 3rd pan in the steam table but it's really the only option. Heating to order and cambros are not options unfortunately. Does putting two 3rd pans together with a little water in the bottom one give good results? I heard about putting them in a piping bag in the steam table, how is this done and does it work? Whatever we do I really want good results as a lot of labor goes into them (my labor!). Thanks in advance

post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by linecook854 View Post

Chef is doing a nice pommes puree for the next week under a braised lamb shoulder. Hate putting mashed in a 3rd pan in the steam table but it's really the only option. Heating to order and cambros are not options unfortunately. Does putting two 3rd pans together with a little water in the bottom one give good results? I heard about putting them in a piping bag in the steam table, how is this done and does it work? Whatever we do I really want good results as a lot of labor goes into them (my labor!). Thanks in advance

Depending on how you make them, they can break when being held just in a steam table.  If you double up the pans you can get some loss in temp and they may not be hot enough.  First, when making them, make sure that you dry out the potatoes after boiling as much as you can, they should look like little pieces of chalk.  This will evaporate most of the water and consolidate the starch and this will stabilize the potato so it won't break so easily.

 

As far as holding, I think the best option is a 2 inch half hotel in the steam table with a towel lining the bottom.  This will help to buffer some of the direct heat so it does not melt the bag.  This will keep them nice and hot, and keep them from breaking.  Make sure that you are using a large tip and you are only cutting a small hole in the bag because the bag will stretch when it is heated.  Keep a towel wrapped around the bag so you can grab and pipe easily, since they are really hot.

 

“Bringing People Together Through Food”

 

Follow me on Linkedin

Reply

 

“Bringing People Together Through Food”

 

Follow me on Linkedin

Reply
post #3 of 16

This is pretty solid advice, I would add that you should use a canvas piping bag instead of a disposable one that will melt.
 

post #4 of 16
Have not done it in quite a few years, but used to use a canvas bag as king suggested, held in a soup tureen in the steam table.
post #5 of 16

I agree  keep in pastry bag with plain or no tube . lay in empty pan  in steam table  it works.

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #6 of 16
Best way I've seen so far is reheating a bit looser than you'd normally like and loading them into a siphon gun and charging with one or two nitrogen charges. Just put the gun in a hot place or for the best results use a circulator set around 140 F (tip: you can get a clip for siphon guns to stay put in a lexan with a circulator.)
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post

I agree  keep in pastry bag with plain or no tube . lay in empty pan  in steam table  it works.

Works like a charm.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 16

Mike why take something easy and make it more complicated and difficult?

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike8913 View Post

Best way I've seen so far is reheating a bit looser than you'd normally like and loading them into a siphon gun and charging with one or two nitrogen charges. Just put the gun in a hot place or for the best results use a circulator set around 140 F (tip: you can get a clip for siphon guns to stay put in a lexan with a circulator.)

Is there anyone who sees this whole idea has bad news written all over it?
post #10 of 16

It does seem overly complicated.

 

I'll throw in behind the pastry bag.  Never had a problem before with a solid pastry bag (canvas), wrapped in a towel, sitting in a steam table.  Use a large, open star tip and it comes out rather elegant.

 

I'll add that once its in the pastry bag, its serve or throw away at that point.  So anything not used that night is either staff food or trash food.  But that would pretty much be true for any whipped pots if theyve been held warm that long.

post #11 of 16
I think you're only finding it complicated because it's new to you. Just like anything else, once you've done it a few times it's as simple as pommes in pastry bag, but the results are more consistent.

It really depends on what you want during service. Nothing wrong with the pastry bag approach, just offering another way.
post #12 of 16
Anyone know of any commercial kitchens for rent on the eastern end of long
Island?
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike8913 View Post

I think you're only finding it complicated because it's new to you. Just like anything else, once you've done it a few times it's as simple as pommes in pastry bag, but the results are more consistent.

It really depends on what you want during service. Nothing wrong with the pastry bag approach, just offering another way.

Mike, thanks for the alternative.  I have seen this done and it does work really well.  Maybe not for everyone because not everyone has a circulator, but if you do you will want to use it for everything.  I think it is just foreign to a lot of people. You get a crazy consistent product, granted that is what the circulator is there for.  The potatoes are also nice and light and not at all broken. A post is meant to spark new ideas and new ways of doing things.

 

“Bringing People Together Through Food”

 

Follow me on Linkedin

Reply

 

“Bringing People Together Through Food”

 

Follow me on Linkedin

Reply
post #14 of 16

If it aint broke ,don't fix it is my motto.

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #15 of 16

thanks for this post, I was thinking of doing this with puree sweet potatoes and was wondering how to hold the puree for an extended time and keep it hot enough that when it goes to the table its still hot and creamy

post #16 of 16

we keep the pommes puree as a mousseline under the heating lamps at the pass, in a pan. just warm enough.

but what I read , is your pommes puree really the thick type.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › Holding Pommes Puree for Service?