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Spanish in the Kitchen - Page 2  

post #31 of 38
Thread Starter 

Thank you Chef Meez. Well said. Finally, another person who is taking my content for what it is for and nothing more.

 

I grew up in a very multicultural area. I have learned to embrace cultures from all over the world at a very young age. So do not insinuate that I am objected to embracing other cultures other than my own. And I, too, am a minority, a child of immigrant parents, mother tongue was not English…so I am not oblivious to what it means to adapt.

 

Foodnfoto, to your comment of “how many of these people I actually know”, as Chef Meez mentioned, I speak from my own experience,- in the kitchens I have worked in the past and the kitchen that I work in now. And if “what others do” affects the overall well-being of the environment, it is something I need to be concerned about (SINCE IT AFFECTS ME). In the kitchen that I work in now, I work dinner (where everyone except the dishwasher speaks English at least well enough to get by). But for the lunch crew, there are a couple of folks that do not speak it. They have trouble understanding even basic questions. They label things in Spanish (some of the items are used by both lunch and dinner crew). Situations like this is asking or assuming that others have knowledge of Spanish. And when I write vital notes on a label such as “use first” or “need to add so and so”, then what? Am I expected to go out and learn Spanish for these types of situations? Does it make more sense that I learn Spanish or they learn English (in a country where the main language spoken is English)?

Cheflayne, our country DOES make it easier for Spanish speakers compared to immigrants from other countries. Press 1 for English. Press 2 for Spanish. Where is press#### for Punjabi, Korean, German, etc.? But that is a whole other endless debate. And please don’t make this about a racial issue because it is anything but.

post #32 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Kim78 View Post

Cheflayne... And please don’t make this about a racial issue because it is anything but.

 

I don't believe that I ever even came close to hinting that it was a racial issue.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
post #33 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

I don't believe that I ever even came close to hinting that it was a racial issue.

Sorry, that quote wasn't aimed directly at you...but to those who apparently have.

post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meezenplaz View Post

Ugh when did she mention favortism?

I didn't put words in her mouth, she mentioned in post number 25

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Miss Kim78 View Post

But why should there be any favoritism towards the Spanish language?

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
post #35 of 38

I have seen more native Spanish speakers speak English than native English speakers speak Spanish.

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

post #36 of 38

I think MissK's post provoked some negative responses because it seems pretty obvious to anyone who isn't blind how she feels about employees in the kitchen who don't speak English, and I also think it's obvious that her issues go deeper than the language barrier. Being of Korean-American descent and having family who have struggled with immigration doesn't automatically endow them with sympathy and compassion for others.

I find it interesting that some of the posts defending Spanish-speaking employees were construed as accusations towards the OP for being a racist and a bigot when no one actually said either of those words, yet some of us cannot logically come to the conclusion that her posts come off as racist although she didn't spell it out..
I think we're all moderately intelligent individuals here, and to deny that her post didn't reek of bigotry, is insulting, and ignorant.

When you use caps for your plural pronouns to refer to any ethnic group such as "THEY" is demeaning and devaluing. The same goes for "their Arses" as well.

This is America, not Europe, and anyone who is an American is well aware that Hispanics are a strong work-force in our economic and social system. Many of those Hispanics have found a niche in the food industry. Demanding that all Hispanics exclusively speak English in a kitchen is like going to Miami-Dade and being angry that most residents are Latino's who speak Spanish.

It's not about "favoritism", but about understanding, compassion, and meeting less fortunate individuals who will probably never be seen with equality no matter how much they work and sacrifice halfway. I am compassionate towards ALL immigrants, of all ethnicities because I have tried to imagine what it would be like to live in a country so totally different than where I was raised. Please, honestly imagine how that would be for yourself, and how it would feel to be treated poorly on top of it all.

90% of the utility workers at my last job spoke very little English, and by little I mean perhaps 30 words, but understood enough English to get by on a daily basis. I realized they wanted to learn English but were embarrassed because some of the English speaking crew members would mock their accents when they tried. I'd always encourage them to speak English and praised them when they did, and you could see how happy they were when someone appreciated their efforts. I even went as far as to print out locations in our area that offered English classes to immigrants wanting to take the citizenship test. Perhaps you can also be a positive influence in some their lives and instead of judging them. I'm sure it would be a very enlightening experience in your life.

I know what it's like to learn a language from scratch because I myself relentlessly studied a foreign language for 9 months in order to visit a country and be able to understand the native language. I did not expect everyone to speak English just because I was a tourist, but I had the luxury to study because I don't work 65 hours a week, I don't have a second job, and I don't have small children in my home.

Sadly, there are some people who no matter what you just can't get through to when it comes to this issue. They hear the word "immigrant" or "immigration" and out they come with their torches. I often choose to just ignore them.

This comment speaks volumes of your attitude towards people who speak Spanish.

 

Quote:
And I do understand and speak a little Spanish (enough to know when someone is talking sh*t about me)

 


I hope for the sake of your own happiness you're able to look at this from an objective standpoint and see that perhaps your approach is a bit intolerant.


Edited by Pollopicu - 4/15/13 at 5:46pm
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

post #37 of 38
Having lived in Puerto Rico during my high school years I learned that islands Spanish and it has been a boon to me in this culinary career. Just an FYI not all dialects of Spanish are the same as with the English language. Also the Latinos are here to stay so we need to be realistic. As most chefs also know there is a lot of diversity within the south American countries and even within the States of Mexico there are many mixed feelings on those from other regions. The latinos have there own communities here in the USA much like the Irish, Italian, Chineese, Korean,Vietnamese,German, Scandanavians and on and on and in there communities they have there own markets, stores, restaurants and even entertainment. What a lot of them do not have is a formal education and is why the ranks of culinary employees are loaded with Latinos. I can say in over thirty years running kitchens Latino crews have been the most loyal, dependable, hard working group of people I have had the privilege of working with.wink.gif To the OP I can understand frustration on your part and congrats on your ability to assimilate into the laungage and culture of America but today you can be considered a minority among the minorities as many people have not the time or even the ability to do what you have done. If it really bothers you perhapsou can change your application questions by adding a quote from Jules ( Pulp Fiction) , English mother@#$%&*, do you speak it?biggrin.gif
The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
post #38 of 38

Thread locked, pending discussion with the ChefTalk moderation team. Some of you need to realize that your perceptions of what people communicate over the internet are not fact. Disagreements are fine, but everyone needs to make their points respectfully.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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