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Ideas to use fresh green garlic?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I scored about a dozen stalks fresh green garlic... not too sure what do with them though. Any ideas? They sure smell incredible!!

post #2 of 22

While it is not traditionally made with actual garlic, I'd look into some japanese nira reba recipes - stir fried liver with chives, and the chives usually are pretty garlicy. Works excellently with the contrast of the fresh garlic / mustard oil smells and the richness of the liver.

post #3 of 22

Use them as you would ordinary chives, "Chinese chives," scallion tops, or "Japanese long onion" tops.  We love and use them all the time on whatever.

 

Tonight, I made low-carb meatloaf for dinner, using a finely finely chopped mirepoix and mushroom "filler" instead of bread, and used a ton of very finely chopped garlic-chives for color and flavor -- as well as a goodly amount of minced, regular garlic.

Apologies for the blur, but you get the idea.

 

If you like garlic chives, you can find them cheap all over SoCal in just about any Asian markets.  Given that you're close to K-Town... no problem.

 

BDL 


Edited by boar_d_laze - 4/17/13 at 6:40pm
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys, but are you talking about garlic chives? 

 

I'm talking about garlic greens: they look like young onions or like big scallions with a ball (like a little onion) at the base. I'll try to post a picture later tonight. 

post #5 of 22

The green tops from young garlic plants and garlic chives cook pretty much the same.

 

BDL

post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 

But... garlic chives are much, much smaller than what I'm looking at? I mean the only garlic chives I've ever seen looked like onion chives, and I'd cut them really really thin and sprinkle them raw on top of a salad or fold them in a sauce. Those are big, tougher stalks... here: I finally took a photograph: 

 

 

post #7 of 22
When in doubt, look to what the Italians do.

Chop them coarsely, sweat in olive oil with a little salt and pepper, until very soft. Add water or light chicken stock and cook at a simmer for 15 minutes or so. Purée in a blender, then strain coarsely to get rid of any tough fibers. Adjust seasoning, add water if too thick, and serve with crusty bread. If preferred, season heavily and chill before serving.

You can extend it by cooking potatoes in it, French-style, or enrich it with egg or cream, but I think you'll find that very pure green garlic soup, made with good olive oil and not much else, will be a revelation.
post #8 of 22

BDL may have been thinking of garlic scapes? 

 

Green garlic makes a fantastic pesto...you can "confit" it and save it for later use as well. Make a puree, freeze some of it, soup is great (as stated above).

 

I mean, really, it is also great is to just saute with vegetables and other dishes in which you would use garlic. It is obviously a bit milder, bit the flavor lends itself well to any type of preparation where garlic is warranted. 

post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post
 
BDL may have been thinking of garlic scapes?

 

Aren't scapes the same as chives?

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Someday View Post

I mean, really, it is also great is to just saute with vegetables and other dishes in which you would use garlic.

 

I have tried sauteeing them for a little bit but they stayed quite tough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisLehrer View Post

Chop them coarsely, sweat in olive oil with a little salt and pepper, until very soft. Add water or light chicken stock and cook at a simmer for 15 minutes or so. Purée in a blender, then strain coarsely to get rid of any tough fibers. Adjust seasoning, add water if too thick, and serve with crusty bread. If preferred, season heavily and chill before serving.

You can extend it by cooking potatoes in it, French-style, or enrich it with egg or cream, but I think you'll find that very pure green garlic soup, made with good olive oil and not much else, will be a revelation.

 

Awesome, thanks for the instructions Chris, I will try that. I shall report later! :)

post #10 of 22

We get fresh garlic at this time of year at the outdoor vegetable markets all the time, FF, though they're generally a bit larger than what you found.  I don't know of the greens being used at all, but then again, Italians always chop off the greens even of scallions (I have to be ever alert to tell them i really only want the green part!  same for beet greens and turnip greens, weird that here of all places they throw that part out!).  But when asked, they told me to peel them and use them as regular garlic.  The smell is nice and they give a nice flavor, as anything fresh does, but there is a lot more skin and a lot less garlic, because the skin is very thick when they're fresh, then when dried it becomes paper thin.

They also told me at the markets where they sell them that they use them like garlic.  I never heard of anyone using them in any particular way. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks for chiming in siduri!

 

The smell is absolutely wonderful, although I feel like either it's already faded a bit, or I've already grown accustomed to it. 

 

Peel them? The skin? I wonder if we're looking at the same stage of the life of the garlic plant? What I'm looking at looks more like a small tough leek with a rounded bulb like a young onion at the base. There is no skin - there are layers, like on a leek. I suppose maybe the outer layer is what later becomes the skin? I'm not too sure. 

 

Unfortunately I can't imagine using it as regular garlic - because it's so tough. Think of it like a very tough old big leek - only smaller and it smells like garlic. 

post #12 of 22

Yeah, french fries, precisely, the skin is the tough part, and inside, there should be a tiny garlic clove!  the skin is fibrous and becomes the paper-like skin.  You probably got ones with microscopic cloves.  Usually they're bigger than the usual garlic you buy, and eventually if you hang them they become smaller as the skin dries (the green part is what they're hung by, usually in braids- but you would know this already - just that it was a kind of surprise to me when i put the two together). 

 

One way to serve certain vegetables here is to put oil and slices of raw garlic on top - you don't need to eat the garlic - but it flavors the food.  Mainly i've seen it on peeled roast peppers (the kind you burn the skin off of) and boiled string beans.  You spread them out on the dish, lay slices of garlic on them scattered around, and then olive oil and salt (they don't use pepper, but i do).  It's a nice way to have the flavor of the vegetables show through.  You could also slice them on a tomato salad.  If you like to eat the cloves of raw garlic, then slice paper thin, and the fibers should nto be a problem. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 

WOW! You're right!! I went to the kitchen and grabbed the largest one and cut it open, and found several small garlic cloves inside!! So the skin is not just the outer layer, but something like the 5 or 6 outer layers!!! Then you find the cloves. WOW. I love this. It's like I just found a little treasure inside. Thank you Siduri!! 

 

I had some left over rib steak that was grilled earlier, I just sprinkled it with fresh S&P and thinly sliced new garlic, eating this now! :))

 

Thanks a lot. 

post #14 of 22

I guess we were talking at cross purposes; I did mean garlic chive when I wrote garlic chive, and you meant garlic tops when you wrote garlic tops.  Go figure.

 

You find garlic chives here as "Chinese chives," if the market bothers to label them at all; they're usually available in several different kinds in Chinese markets; the long thin ones with the flower tops being the most tender, desirable and most expensive; the flat ones being the least expensive, a drier, more fibrous, and something like a piece of leek.  I almost always have one type or another of garlic chive on hand, usually the cheap, tough type, because that's what the nearby Armenian market stocks.  They work about as well as long as they're chopped fine.

 

The tops from those garlic plants which are like leeks when they're cut from the bulb can be used in the same way as garlic chives providing they're very young and ... wait for it ... as long as they're chopped fine; prepped in the same way as you would leeks. 

 

No.  I don't have pictures of garlic tops I've known and loved in the past, and seldom take pictures of my own food.  I only took the blurry picture of the meatloaf to show that the chives were, indeed, cut very fine (unlike the carrots, onion, and celery which were merely fine); because it was hanging around fresh from the oven -- and had rested just long enough to be cut; and because -- bacon barding aside -- my meatloaf is more pate de campagne than most Americans', and I thought French Fries would enjoy the visual as homey. 

 

BDL

post #15 of 22

Green garlic and mushroom risotto, pickled green garlic for fruit salads. Just a few that I can think of.

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by helloitslucas View Post

Green garlic and mushroom risotto, pickled green garlic for fruit salads. Just a few that I can think of.

 

Thanks! So is that with the garlic cloves only, or also with the "green"... "skin"...? 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

my meatloaf is more pate de campagne than most Americans', and I thought French Fries would enjoy the visual as homey.

 

And that I did! Wish I could have bit into it though. smile.gif

post #17 of 22

I keep the white parts for actual cooking(green garlic and mushroom risotto) and keep the green parts for pickling. I make sure to use the thicker, green part for that and not the very thin ends because the don't stand up to pickling very well.

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks Lucas. So for the risotto you'd only use the garlic cloves themselves, discarding the 5 or 6 outer layers of "skin"... correct? 

post #19 of 22

Correct, but I don't discard them. They're thrown in pickling liquid. :)

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 

Great. Thanks for sharing. 

post #21 of 22

The bulb should be tender enough to chop up and use by saute, or whatever. Just mince/slice it fine like a shallot, and it should be fine. If your garlic isn't "green" enough, then maybe it would be tough, but for true young garlic you should be able to use it. 

post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 

Ok Someday I'll try that. Thanks!

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