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Came across an interesting recipe

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Starts with a half a pail of potatoes.  This is from the Ecuador chapter in "Hungry Planet:  What the World Eats."

 

 

potatosoup.jpg 1,384k .jpg file

post #2 of 18

Interesting :)  I'll just nip out and see the cow is going...  Wondering too which pail I should take for the potatoes, the teeny one or the ginormous one...

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

It's humbling isn't it?  One bite size of lamb per person if available.

post #4 of 18

Yeah but-- but it doesnt say what to do if the family cow ISNT producing!? surprised.gif

 

 I love these old world recipes, like

 

1 small pail clear-running brook water

1/2 lb fresh churned butter

post #5 of 18

A friend of mine had an old andalusian cookbook. Recipes tended to start like "select the fattest ram from your flock...:" 

 

I love reading such material. Whether you go into the past or into foreign cultures, that stuff gives you perspective. Always useful to reevaluate your position here. Yes, there are places and times where milk does not come in gallon jugs from the supermarket.

post #6 of 18

I have a couple old recipe books that tell how to cook possum, raccoon, etc.  They are fun to look at and read

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

It's humbling isn't it?  One bite size of lamb per person if available.


Yes, humbling indeed. Reminds me a recipe I once read and saved from Anne Franks Diary.

 

 

 

Quote:
Potato Kugel
 
Put peeled potatoes through a food mill and add a little dry government issue flour and salt. Grease a mold or ovenproof dish with paraffin or stearin and bake for 2 1/2 hours. Serve with rotten strawberry compote. (Onions not available. Nor oil for mold or dough!)
 
-Diary of a Young Girl
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

It's humbling isn't it?  One bite size of lamb per person if available.

It really puts things in perspective

 

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post #9 of 18

While I certainly appreciate the sympathy that this thread has prompted, the recipe is interesting to me for a completely different reason.  I'm Ecuadorian and have enjoyed locro de papas on countless occasions.  I've had it in nice restaurants, in homes, and street side stands, and I've never had any locro with cabbage, carrot, green beans, or lamb!  I guess I could see adding a small amount of lemon juice to brighten it up, but even that ingredient seems out of place to me.  On the other hand, it seems to be missing some of the elements that are found on a fairly consistent basis - achiote, cheese, and avocado.  Does the recipe indicate what part of the country it comes from or when it is dated?  I am really curious because it strikes me that the recipe above would produce a very different soup than the one I grew up loving!  It may also be very good, of course, but so different that I am stumped about the origin.  Please let me know!  

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCobb1045 View Post

While I certainly appreciate the sympathy that this thread has prompted, the recipe is interesting to me for a completely different reason.  I'm Ecuadorian and have enjoyed locro de papas on countless occasions.  I've had it in nice restaurants, in homes, and street side stands, and I've never had any locro with cabbage, carrot, green beans, or lamb!  I guess I could see adding a small amount of lemon juice to brighten it up, but even that ingredient seems out of place to me.  On the other hand, it seems to be missing some of the elements that are found on a fairly consistent basis - achiote, cheese, and avocado.  Does the recipe indicate what part of the country it comes from or when it is dated?  I am really curious because it strikes me that the recipe above would produce a very different soup than the one I grew up loving!  It may also be very good, of course, but so different that I am stumped about the origin.  Please let me know!  

 

Ah well, it's from this book:  http://www.amazon.com/Hungry-Planet-What-World-Eats/dp/0984074422

 

The family is very poor.

post #11 of 18

I collect a lot of old cookbooks ( have numerous from the 1800's) and you see this all the time in them.  Also directions tend to be quite limited.  Recipes such as these tend have an expectation that the user knows how to cook and doesn't feel the need to spell everything out for the user, unlike modern cookbooks that seem to feel the need to walk the user through every step of the process while holding their hand.  Not saying that this cookbook is doing that, it just reminds of the recipes I read in those old books.

post #12 of 18

@JayCobb1045;

This is incredibly interesting! In my own country we have some sort of similar ancient potato soup that's been around since ages. It goes by different names depending on the region, but we call it "stampers" or "melkstampers". It has a consistency between a soup and a puree.

 

This dish was certainly poor people's food, but I remember many decades ago, in the Lent periods, this was an entire meal. Nowadays it's revived and on some bistro's menus, served in a more posh way like I did with shrimp, poached egg etc. In the old days, it was only stampers, a slice of dark bread and some cheese. Humbling indeed!

 

Basically this soup is made from potatoes and buttermilk, so it's as the french say "simple comme bonjour" to make; boil potatoes until nicely soft, puree, add hot but not boiling buttermilk and stir until it's a thick soup. Melt a little butter to hazelnut color and pour it over the dish just before serving. Many times a little sorrel was shredded and added. It needs to be well seasoned and that was it. As you can see I added a little shrimp, a poached egg, some Gouda cheese and scallion. I happen to make this dish only for myself as nobody around here likes the sour-ish taste of the buttermilk. I think it's heaven!

 

 

 

 

 

post #13 of 18

Chris , that dish can warm the cockles of any heart.

 

@ Kuan: Someone sent me this recipe this morning and I just had to share it. Hold your breath , here it is :

 

 

 

"PERIOD: England, 17th century | SOURCE: The Closet Of the Eminently Learned Sir Kenelme Digby Kt. Opened, 1677 | CLASS: Authentic

DESCRIPTION: A drink of ale, chicken broth, & sack

Cock-Ale.

Take eight gallons of Ale, take your Cock and boil him well; then take four pounds of Raisins of the Sun well stoned, two or three Nutmegs, three or four flakes of Mace, half a pound of Dates; beat these all in a Mortar, and put to them two quarts of the best Sack: and when the Ale hath done working, put these in, and stop it close six or seven days, and then bottle it, and a month after you may drink it."

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #14 of 18

Ecuador seems to be the only Andes country that makes locro without corn. Locro is kind of a national 'patriotic' dish here in Arg., unthinkable without corn. 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 

LOL Petals!  :D   I can't stop laughing!  Gotta show that around.  :)

post #16 of 18

Chris - our Ecuadorian locro doesn't include buttermilk or the other garnishes you added, but the texture sounds very similar.  It's sort of a mix between a puree, a soup, and chunky "smashed" potatoes.  Fresh avocado slices and cheese often garnish it, and some places offer crumbled chorizo on top as well, though I think that takes away from the potato-ey goodness!

 

I usually add some sour cream when I make mashed potatoes at home, so I totally understand the sour element that the buttermilk adds in your recipe.  Next cold rainy night I might give it a whirl!  Are your garnishes of shrimp, scallion, poached egg, and gouda typical or just things you like to add?

post #17 of 18

Do you cut garnish julianne or brunoise?

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCobb1045 View Post

.....

 Are your garnishes of shrimp, scallion, poached egg, and gouda typical or just things you like to add?

Jay, they are all typical, but many times not all at the same time. In the old days it was gouda and egg. Also, depends on the region; at our small seaside, that fabulous Northsea shrimp goes in, sometimes with a poached egg. The scallions are somewhat out of place but go nicely with the dish.

I have to remember your chorizo suggestion. Maybe fry it first to get a nice crumbly consistency. I love that smokey pimenton taste in spanish chorizo, but it has to used sparingly, as you mentioned, it overtakes all other flavors when overdone.

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