or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Making my rice dishes a little more interesting
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Making my rice dishes a little more interesting

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hey everyone, I have recently switched from white rice to brown and wild rice because of the superior nutritional value - the problem is I find the grainy taste a little bit off-putting.  Right now I will have a 1/2 cup per meal, usually boiled in chicken broth with some oregano and basil and added quinoa.  It gets the job done but it still feels really lackluster.  Do any of you have tips or ideas for making brown rice dishes more exciting?  The problem right now is that there isn't any flavour that particularly stands out.

 

 

Any ideas would be appreciated!

post #2 of 11

I make brown rice at least 3 times a week at home, and I too became bored of the blah texture so what I started doing is sauteeing onions in olive oil, once those are translucent enough I add the rice and water (or chix broth), then add old bay seasoning which health-wise is ok in my book. No MSG, or anything of the sort. It comes out tasting like mock rice pilaf.

 

 

Old Bay Ingredients:

 

CELERY SALT (SALT, CELERY SEED), SPICES (INCLUDING RED PEPPER AND BLACK PEPPER), AND PAPRIKA.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #3 of 11

I forgot to add a wild rice dish I found in a deli buffet i frequented on my lunch break located on west 14th street in Manhattan, and has been a hit in my family for years.

 

Make wild rice like you normally would. Then add honey, raisins, and toasted walnuts. You can eat it warm or cold. Super healthy and delicious.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #4 of 11

I treat brown rice exactly as I do with white rice. I pair it with similar dishes. If I am making a white rice I usually serve it with a strong, "on it's own" fish such as fresh salmon or tuna. If I make brown rice I serve it with pike, smallmouth bass or any other freshwater fish. It is a bit of a different texture.

I noticed you are from ON, Canada. Pair it with the amazing game you have there. Elk, trout, etc. licklips.gif

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
Reply
Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
Reply
post #5 of 11

What have you done in the past to make white rice more exciting? As helloitslucas mentioned, the same approach should work with brown rice.

 

I make brown rice at home a lot and I usually finish it with a splash of soy and extra virgin olive oil. Along the same lines, a splash of vinaigrette (made to pair with the accompaining dishes) will also work.

 

Another finishing touch is a sprinkle of furikake. I especially like aji nori furikake, but there are tons of variations out there.

 

Go crazy!

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #6 of 11

I love white rice. Throw some sugar, soy sauce and a bit of mirin in there and it is golden. The same can be said for brown rice. Toss some miso paste(dissolved before boiling of course) into the water that you boil the brown rice in.

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
Reply
Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
Reply
post #7 of 11

Brendon  wild rice is really not rice at all. Most of it comes from Minnesota and it is classified a grain. Cook it in the oven Pilaf style it will taste  much better. Try adding sliced sautéed mushrooms or sauté some onion, fresh thyme. This makes it more savory. Make a fried rice

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #8 of 11
Fried rice, stir fries with rice, nasi goreng, nasi kuning.....
Maybe google some asian websites and you will find loads of recipes.
Check out
She simmers (thai)
Vietnamese kitchen
Http://asiancook.eu (indonesian)
And there are plenty more. These are just a couple I really like.

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply
post #9 of 11

The only brown rice I have found that tastes good is brown basmati.  I tend to cook all my rice dishes in a risotto style, meaning I sautee onion and other aromatics first in olive oil and butter then add the rice and toast it, then I add stock or water.  I do not enjoy steamed or plain boiled rice. 

 

In order to add flavor you must add ingredients.  One of my favorites is sauteeing onion, mushrooms and carrots and adding the rice.  Before it's done I add frozen peas too.  Classic side dish.

 

Another classic of mine is sauteeing onion in butter and olive oil, then adding rice and lots of lemon, water, and a couple of strands of saffron.

 

Or add spinach and herbs.  The possibilities are endless.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #10 of 11

I'm with Koukouvagia with the basmati rice. A good quality on its own has so much flavour. Of course it's nutritional, but first and foremost, the flavour is outstanding.

 

On a personal note, the rice, in general, is the base of the meal...The carrier...the back-drop to the scene you are creating. An excellent white rice can be as healthy as any uber healthy one when the rest of the meal is balanced. A plain basmati, or a Thai sticky rice can be a a perfectly healthy foil to your healthy meal. 

"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
Reply
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
Reply
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you everyone for your advice.  I have tried most of the suggestions here and they were very tasty, made eating the rice much less of a chore.

 

I will also switch to basmati once I have exhausted the plain brown rice.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Making my rice dishes a little more interesting