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Need help on buying starter knife kits

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hi Everyone, 

I am new on the site.  I am a pastry chef so this has been tasked to me.  We run a non profit scholarship foundation helping with classroom equipment and scholarships for high school vocational programs and this year our top two applicants were both culinary,  One culinary and one baking.  Part of the scholarship we awarded is a professional knife set.  We have set a limit of $500 and would like to get them knife bags/ rolls, and a few necessary knifes.  I want something sturdy and that will be a good knife for a ling time to come.  i have been talking to all my chef friends about what they like and have and global comes up a lot but seem to be a little our price range.  I have F. Dicks and I love them but am hearing that in the chef side they are to heavy and thick bladed and most dont like them.  Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.  Thank you in advance.  

post #2 of 7
Do you have purveyors you work with? I just recently ordered a set that included an 8" chefs knife, steel, fork, slicer, boning knife, and paring knife for around 299.00. All black diamond. It's a great beginners set for an apprentice.

I personally have a full whustof set that was given to me as a gift as an apprentice many many years ago. Ive had to replace a few pieces over the years but I'd never part with it.
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

I can get from anyone, Black Diamond is Sysco?  I also am near ( a few hours) from Mac Knifes, and was thinking about taking a drive over there.  How long have you had them?  Are they holding up well? My personal impression of the sysco knifes are that they loose the edge kind of quickly and maybe its just my work but are trashed in a short time period.  I want to get the absolute maximum in price and product and have sets that make these kids look like professionals when looking for their jobs.  

post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roo61384 View Post

I can get from anyone, Black Diamond is Sysco?  I also am near ( a few hours) from Mac Knifes, and was thinking about taking a drive over there.  How long have you had them?  Are they holding up well? My personal impression of the sysco knifes are that they loose the edge kind of quickly and maybe its just my work but are trashed in a short time period.  I want to get the absolute maximum in price and product and have sets that make these kids look like professionals when looking for their jobs.  

The Black Diamond are made by F Dick for Sysco and others they have are made by Dexter.

 

Good idea to ask Mac and maybe some other makers. Can't hurt.

 

Jim

post #5 of 7
We have a set of "house" Sysco knives and they do tend to loose their edges quickly.

However, I give my chefs a diamond set upon completion of training and let them add to their set with their own discretion.

We've had great success with diamond. But I also keep a whetstone readily available for them to sharpen and hone as needed.

And typically, after training how to hone and sharpen, I have only had a few that needed replacement.

Again, these are beginner sets just to keep them a set of knives and be successful until they're ready to upgrade.
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys. I will talk my sysco rep when i see him tomorrow.
post #7 of 7

there are a few brands that offer good bang for buck on Japanese style knives that could work for your budget

 

far as i can see there are 3 things you need to work out:

1) Steel - do you go carbon or stainless? stainless will probably be cheaper, and will be easier to maintain. but lots of people love carbon and they take a better edge quicker.

 

2) Wa handle or western handle. Just a question of taste really

 

3) What you want to include in the set.

i think a classic set would be something like the following 5:
 * petty (120-180mm)

 * chef or gyuto (210-270mm)

 * sujihiki (suji) or slicing knife (240-300mm)

 * bread knife (240-300mm)

 * plus something to deal with bones. could go for a Honesuki, or a heavy duty chefs knife. (150-240mm)

but maybe you'd rather just do 3 knives of a higher quality?

 

 

some examples and costs below

 

Tojiro DP (Stainless Steel)
(you can get japanese wa handle, or western handle)
150mm petty - approx $60
150mm honesuki - approx $80
240mm gyuto - approx $120
270mm suji - approx $110
270mm bread - approx $70
total - $440
 
Fujiwara (Stainless Steel)
145mm boning - approx $65
150mm petty - approx $44
240mm gyuto - approx $83
270mm suji - approx $88
total incl Tojiro DP bread - $350
 
i also hear Artifex and Carbonext are reasonable choices
 
EDIT: also seen lots of people raving about the Hiromoto GS knives (was trying to remember that earlier but never came to me).
 
if you wanted to go for a heavy duty chefs knife as the one to deal with bones, then i think i read someone recommending the Forschner / Victorinox Cimeter. it's not Japanese but for this kind of knife it can make sense to go with thicker western style knives. and you can get the 10" for about $35.
 
here's an example set which probably wouldn't be hideous:
150mm Fujiwara petty - approx $44
240mm Hiromoto GS gyuto - approx $165
250mm Forschner / Victorinox Cimeter - approx $35
270mm Tojiro bread - approx $70
total - $314
that leaves you $186. then you could also get a couple of stones (maybe Beston 500 and Bester 1200 - total cost around $100)
 
this is all assuming you meant $500 each, and not total for 2 sets.

Edited by ruscal - 4/24/13 at 10:12am
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