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Second Rinse

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I am a line cook (1 yr) and I am nearly through culinary school.  I work at a gastropub that has a diverse menu of appetizers, small plates, and a handful of full entrees....

 

I realize that there are things that you do at your chef's behest even if you do not agree with them...

 

But what is this concept of a second rinse on bones (beef bones) to make a stock?  In my experience and on the spoon, that "second rinse" is horribly bitter, and only mildly "beefy." 

 

For clarifications, they are femur bones used to make a jus that goes along with sirloin strip steak.  Most of the colagen is gone, and to reduce it to a gelatinous syrupy consistency only concentrates the bitter...

 

Is this common practice?

post #2 of 10

Second rinse?? Do you mean bringing to boil discarding and starting again?  This is normally only done with a white stock.

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post #3 of 10

It's called remouillage. Good for employee soup.

post #4 of 10

My remi wants to marry your demi

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #5 of 10
A remi will always have less punch, but it shouldn't be bitter. Usually that tells me the bones were scorched when they were roasted, and your demi should probably is a little bitter too. Sometimes the mire poix or tomato paste may have been the culprit too.

Reduced remi makes great french onion stock, great to boost braising liquids, and anywhere else you could use a little boost without scooping into precious demi.
post #6 of 10

A lot of places make a remi, combine it with the first stock, and reduce both together. Some places use remi for another purpose--its great for braising things (you get the collagen but allow the meat in the braise to flavor the sauce). 

 

If it is bitter then something is wrong. It should not be bitter. You guys might be caramelizing your bones too much, too much pincee on the tomato paste (if you do that), or your veg are burned. 

 

I've never seen this done with beef bones (which have much less gelatin than veal) only veal. But when done properly it is a great way to maximize use out of expensive veal bones. 

post #7 of 10
I prefer to take my first first stock and combine it with the remi and reduce to get a very flavorful stock, it takes more time but the results are that much better.
post #8 of 10
I agree with the posts above.  Use it to fortify and check your recipe if it is better.  It is great because it is a full utilization of your product.  Food cost, food cost, food cost.

 

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post #9 of 10

im a big fan of using the remi for the second stock instead of water.... 

post #10 of 10

I use second rinse for braising.  

 

But this has me wondering, anybody ever use it as part of the liquid when wet smoking?  Wondering if it would be useful for adding some extra flavor, e.g. veal for smoked pork or chicken.  Also wondering if it would muck up the inside of the smoker with the extra grease going round.  

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