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Novice Questions For Professionals Thread

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I thought a thread like this might be a good idea. I have some questions I would like cleared up. 1) If I'm cooking something hot should I season it with salt in the beginning, middle and end? or should I wait to the end? 2) Is the saying true or false: "If your kitchen smells good, you are losing flavor in your dish" Thank You. 

post #2 of 10

You need to season through all steps.   Adjust your seasoning throughout all steps and you are less likely to have a mis-step and if you do you can adjust a bit on the next step.   Also remember some seasonings do more than just change taste - they can change texture and some also need to be heated in order to be appreciated.

 

Question 2 is kind of silly... never heard of that saying before.   Aroma can be changed / modified very easily by the cook, and the food will simply change as the cook modifies technique.   Some things are meant to be aromatic and others less so.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post

Question 2 is kind of silly... never heard of that saying before.   Aroma can be changed / modified very easily by the cook, and the food will simply change as the cook modifies technique.   Some things are meant to be aromatic and others less so.

 

That question is a talking point brought up by the molecular crowd quite often. Anything you can smell in the kitchen is flavour lost from the actual dish. Well, yeah, but generally, there is plenty more of it where that smell came from. I am not dismissing hundreds of techniques for that idea and start vac-sealing or pressure cooking everything because of that notion.

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneMachine View Post

 

That question is a talking point brought up by the molecular crowd quite often. Anything you can smell in the kitchen is flavour lost from the actual dish. Well, yeah, but generally, there is plenty more of it where that smell came from. I am not dismissing hundreds of techniques for that idea and start vac-sealing or pressure cooking everything because of that notion.

Certainly for the home cook, the tantalizing smells coming from the kitchen are a lot more appetizing than some appetizers that simply fill you up!  Part of the joy is the smell, and most of the flavor is the smell.  If you REALLY want to trap the smells in, you could devise a capsule that you bit into to release the smell into the back of the nose as you eat, but really!  is that desirable?  I want to smell my food before i taste it.  Eating is an experience that takes place in a context, not a laboratory tasting experiment.  The the smell of the dish as you anticipate it, the people, the conversation, everything.  

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #5 of 10

How would one fry bacon without releasing any aroma, keeping it all in the bacon?

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

How would one fry bacon without releasing any aroma, keeping it all in the bacon?

 

mjb.

Ok, now we nerd out, but in all seriousness, me and friend of mine (both biochemists) thought about frying bacon immersed in a bath of molten nitrite salts... Should melt at about 250°C - the technique is used in metallurgy as a heat bath for heat treatment of aluminium casts. We called it "deep cure frying". Never tried it, though ;)

post #7 of 10
Ever hear of sand roasting, or frying? Used in Indian cusine, mainly on ground nuts. A guy around hear used to sell sand roasted chic peas, they were amazing.
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanMcPherson View Post

Ever hear of sand roasting, or frying? Used in Indian cusine, mainly on ground nuts. A guy around hear used to sell sand roasted chic peas, they were amazing.

Great ... thanks a ton.

 

Something else that I just have to try out!  tongue.gif

 

Can we get the day changed to 26 hours?

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #9 of 10
Sounds like a good idea, until you realize the extra two hours would be earmarked for paperwork.

Al
post #10 of 10

alas...    the devil and roller-skates!

 

At least throw me a few short-cuts... so I don't have to sift through dozens of google searches.

 

I'm thinking washed play-box sand the courser the better?

Heat in deep dish pans in the oven to 550+ maybe use the cleaning cycle to really heat things up.

Pour half in a roaster... add food then add other half of sand.

Put back in oven?  or for quick cooking foods just let it sit?

 

Cleaning cycle is 800+ degrees, some foil and dough and you could do some pretty interesting things!

 

...screw it I want the 2 hours i'll just neglect the paper work and play!

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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