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Baking temp

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I made an Italian Cream cake from a recipe I got off of Food Network. After baking I took it out and let it cool and it gradually shrank. Should I have baked it at a lower temperature? It didn't come out flat as a pancake, but it was flatter than when I took it out of the oven. I use spring form pans and cool on a rack after removing the pan sides. What is the relationship between temp and result? If I slow down the baking would the cake "fix" in it's most risen position better? I just don't know. The cake was very tasty and the texture was just fine. I wonder how it would have been otherwise?

 

My thanks to the pros here. If I could just get things right I might be able to contribute to these discussions rather than always asking.

I should've been a chef. Where else can you eat your work?
Searching for food nirvana!
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I should've been a chef. Where else can you eat your work?
Searching for food nirvana!
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post #2 of 6

As things heat up, they expand.  Cool down and they contract like my tart crust and bread.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Exactly. But not by so much, I think.  How tall should a 9" round be?
 

I should've been a chef. Where else can you eat your work?
Searching for food nirvana!
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I should've been a chef. Where else can you eat your work?
Searching for food nirvana!
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post #4 of 6

The height will depend on how high the recipe has been written to rise and how much batter you pour in the pan.

Most of my cake recipes bake up pretty flat, but I still make it a habit on shooting for a 3 inch layer just in case I need to trim a bit.

Several reasons for shrinkage... off kilter leavenings, too much protien in the flour combined with vigorus mixing will most times cause this to happen.

Is this the first time you have made this particular recipe?

 

mimi

also on the Gulf Coast of Texas....

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

Here it is another Sunday and I can turn my attention to cooking.

Yes it was the first time. The layers came out about 2". I use my counter mixer and try not to overdo anything. Maybe I should use special flour like "cake flour."

I guess I'll just keep plugging away to see what happens.
 

I should've been a chef. Where else can you eat your work?
Searching for food nirvana!
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I should've been a chef. Where else can you eat your work?
Searching for food nirvana!
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post #6 of 6
Unless a cake recipe specifies a certain type flour then use AP ( all purpose) flour.
Sometimes it will specify bleached or non bleached.
I always sift my dry ingedients together after measuring just to make sure the batter will be smooth and I won't overmix trying to get those lumps out.

mimi
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