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What is your favorite thing to cook?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Every chef has that go to food that they just love to cook.  I am interested to see what other chefs love to cook.  I love scallops, there is just something so rewarding with getting a scallop perfect.  It is nice and creamy on the inside and has a slight crust if you do it right.  The golden brown color on the outside is amazing.  Just one of those things I guess...  My tips are brine the scallops for 30 minutes prior to cooking this way you do not get salt crystals on the outside and you get a better crust on the outside.  Sear the scallops in a stainless steel pan, you get a better crust as well.  Looking forward to hearing from the other chefs.

 

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post #2 of 13

As silly as it sounds, Hollandaise is my favorite. Something very satisfying about it all coming together just the way it should.
 

post #3 of 13

The perfect eggs benedict, which has to have a well made hollandaise.

It is so hard to find hollandaise that's not out of a can anymore, a lot fewer cooks coming up these days ever learn how to make it.

The only thing they know is add some powder out of a green can to milk and butter.

post #4 of 13

Soups, and cooking meats to perfection.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #5 of 13

I had a good long thunk about this one and I think it has be dishes like ox cheek chilli, osso bucco, those things that take a pretty crappy piece of meat and turn it into a good bowl of gelatinous, coma inducing goodness. That may be because I don't get to cook anything like that at work I suppose, or just because I'm a carnivorous glutton, who knows?

 

BTW, canned hollandaise?!?! That really exists? And people that call themselves cooks use it?


Edited by wurzel - 4/29/13 at 3:09pm
post #6 of 13

How do you make the perfect hollandaise..?

 

I was taught to put the butter and egg yolks in a cold pan, over low heat, whisk constantly while the butter melts, then add your lemon juice and season..

post #7 of 13

In technicality this would be hollandaise. much in the same way that melting cheese over elbow pasta would be mac and cheese.

 

A good hollandaise starts with a good reduction. This reduction should be mostly acid with a bit of water, as acid raises the coagulation temp of your protein (the egg yolk). My reduction consists of champagne vin, shallots, pepper corns, lemon juice, bay leaves, and a bit of water. This next part is where people start to differ in my experience. Almost all agree that butter should be melted, but some prefer whole and some prefer clarified. I personally use whole butter that has separated because you get the best of both worlds this way. Next you whisk your egg yolks over heat with a bit of reduction (I use 4 egg yolks to 2 ounces of reduction) until the eggs heat up a bit and start to froth. A double boiler type set up is good to use the first few times (Some people even keep using it, as the temp of water is a constant thing and it helps) The egg will thicken slightly but will not scramble if you've done this right. Now you add your butter (which is about 130-145 degrees as is the egg yolk) Whisking constantly I use 2.5 ounces of butter per egg yolk but larger batches will hold much more butter. Finally season to taste.
 

Would love to hear how you guys do it.

post #8 of 13

Making custards, especially in quiches & tarts.

post #9 of 13

@Kingfarvito:

 

Much the same technique as you, I use shallot, half cider vinegar and half white wine vinegar along with black peppercorns and a little green peppercorn for my reduction. I use clarified butter myself, it comes out that much firmer without the buttermilk... I like a hollandaise that sticks to your tubes on the way down biggrin.gif
 

rdm magic's little cheat sounds interesting though, I guess it would incorporate fine as the butter melts slowly but if anything I'd say it will take a fair bit longer than melting your butter first. A good hollandaise really needs the punch from a good reduction though.

post #10 of 13

I enjoy working with puff pastry.

 

Hollandaise ? You might enjoy this thread : Hollandaise Sauce Question

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #11 of 13
Biscuits! Love making perfect, light, flaky, buttery biscuits. Brioche is another favorite of mine. Love the silky, elastic feel of a perfect brioche dough.

I also enjoy cooking fish of all kinds. Feels good, man.
post #12 of 13

Thanks for that link petalsandcoco, interesting read. I never knew there was so much controversy over hollandaise confused.gif

post #13 of 13

I love cooking seafood...so instantly rewarding. However I really enjoy baking too. Nothing like pulling a warm flaky crusted apple pie out the oven. Love the smell too...best aroma therapy. It's just so homey and satisfying when it comes out perfectly.

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