or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Broccoli sauce

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hey gang, I'm looking for a little help with an idea I'm playing around with.  I want to make a broccoli sauce, and ideally it would be a beautiful vivid green color, taste distinctly of broccoli, and be a nice smooth saucy consistency.  I've been able to get as far as the first two by essentially pureeing some steamed broccoli, but when I pass it through a sieve what comes out is quite watery, not green, and not that flavorful.  It seems that the "essence" of broccoli is trapped in its solids.  Any suggestions on correcting my technique above, or totally different approaches would be really welcome.  Thanks in advance!

post #2 of 11

What is this a sauce for?  what are you going to put it on?  

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Well I had an idea to do cheese with broccoli sauce instead of the traditional broccoli with cheese sauce.  The cheese element would be along the lines of an Argentinian grilled provoleta, then topped with this broccoli sauce.  Who knows if it will be any good, but I'd like to give it a try, and I'm stuck on this darned broccoli sauce!

post #4 of 11
This isnt going to help you much but one of the best plates of food I ever had was a snapper dish served with a broccoli sause. It was a muted green, like raw broccoli, thick like mornay. The kicker was the sauce was finished with the flourettes ofmthe broccoli. It really looked like,the vegetable had just melted into the plate. That was nearly ten years ago and I still,think about it.

Al
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Al - Although the color you describe is a little different from what I envisioned, that sounds just like what I had in mind.  And I love the idea of garnishing the sauce with fresh flourettes.  In fact, the contrast of the darker green with (blanched?) flourettes could be a nice touch.  Now just let me know where you ate it, and the email address of the chef at the time, and I'll hunt that recipe down! There isn't an emoticon for "unreasonably optimistic" but if there was, I would have used it just then.

post #6 of 11

If you take a look at Michel Roux Jr in this video , you will see how he extracts the chlorophyll to achieve that wonderful rich green color.

Not many do this today but this is a classic French Technique.

You can always incorporate this into your broccoli sauce.

If you did this then you would be able to make many different levels of color by adding cream.

 

In this video he is making a terrine of fish. Go to 2:08 of the video to see the technique.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6xGa8q92Kg

 

A thought.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #7 of 11
You asked for it....

The Chef is Frederic Filliodeau. He is currently at the Ottawa Sheraton. At the time he was exc. at LCB Ottawa in house Restaurant, Signatures. In those days Signatures was a five Diamond place, and while part of the school, did not use the students as staff. A truely great experience. I raved to chef at the time about that sauce, keep in mind he was my teacher at the time. Never offered it up then, so, good luck to you!

Al
post #8 of 11

I have a broccoli sauce recipe. Lots of roasted and confit garlic, walnuts and cream. Rather complex tho. Too many steps.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #9 of 11

Are you open to adding other ingredients or do you prefer to keep the lone flavor of broccoli?  Because parsley does transfer color when incorporating into a sauce.  I'm thinking a broccoli/parsley pesto incorporated into a light bechamel and then strained. 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #10 of 11

Maybe you need a better blender? If what you're ending up with is watery it sounds like your blender isn't doing a very good job of it, my blender wouldn't leave much in the chinois after passing.

 

You could try freezing the broccoli before cooking, this will break down some of the fibres and possibly make it puree better.

post #11 of 11

About 90% of broccoli (as in many vegetables) is water. To increase savor, you must squeeze the water out of the broccoli and there're are a lot of methods to do that, from hand squeezing to oven roasting the broccoli. 

I'm working in a broccoli sauce just now. Will post tomorrow, but in advance let me point something: the taste of broccoli is not so much in the florets as it is in the stems. But the stems are almost light green, while the florets are really dark green. He, he!

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking