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Special knife as gift for culinary student - Page 2

post #31 of 44

I bought it to replace an older one which had whittled down to nothing, shortly after moving from our old house in Venice to one in MDR in '88.  I'm sure that it was Cuisine de France, and remember it as being purchased online.  But if Amazon didn't exist... from where?  It's possible I found it in a catalog.  

 

Hard to remember life at the dawn of the e-tail age.  There's another hazy section of my memory extending from 1965 to around 1979.   

 

BDL 

post #32 of 44
Gifting a knife is to say goodbye for ever. It is considered bad luck. The idea that the school gives you crapy knives is incorrect. Most students these days get a set of messermister. These are good quality but students aren't shown to care for them. Perhaps a book on keeping your knife sharp. With indepth knowledge of how to care for your blade even a dexter can out perform a masamoto. Or the book every student wishes they had and will make them a star student. The 'modernist cuisine' 450us six volume great investment.
If you do decide after all to give your novice an advanced blade just go to korin.com and buy what you can afford. Tell them what you want it for and they will help you select.
Edited by Joelzer0 - 5/31/13 at 4:05am
post #33 of 44

WOW.

post #34 of 44

 These are good quality but students aren't shown to care for them. - even most professional cooks do not know how to care for their own knives. much less sharpen them.

post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joelzer0 View Post

Gifting a knife is to say goodbye for ever. It is considered bad luck.

 

If your going to be superstitious it's only bad luck to give a knife if the recipient doesn't give a coin to the person giving the knife to them.

In some cultures giving a knife is a sign of respect.

Setting that aside I've used Dexter's for years and used them for gifts to my cooks many times. They work just fine but the notion they will "out perform" a Masamoto is more than a bit of a stretch.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

  • I've got nothing against santokus for other people.  Whatever works for you is jake with me.  

 

Huh?? Leave me out of this....smile.gif

 

btw. I own a santoku and I like it. I can do almost everything with it, but a bigger knife is more versatile.  

 

I agree with DuckFat and IceMan. Knives are very personal. Gift certificates work great, and the knives students get at school will suffice until they get experience and know what they want. They will also see other chefs at work and get another round of opinion and commentary from people they interact with. 

 

My 2 cents. 

post #37 of 44

Joel,

 

First: 

+1 with Duckfat.

 

Second:

If you're trying to say that a sharp Dexter will out perform a dull Masamoto... well, yes.  Any sharp knife will out perform any dull one.  If you're trying to say that someone who knows how to sharpen can get the same edge geometry, edge taking and edge holding out of a Dexter Sani, Messermeister Elite (crap by the way), or even a Victorinox as a Masamoto VG, that's absurd.  

 

Any dull knife is a dull knife and all dull knives are pretty much equal.  But after that, not so much.  And by the way, that's the reason I tried to get the OP -- who seems to have lost interest in the thread, bless his heart -- to recognize the need for sharpening.   

 

Third:

The OP, proud father of a young woman beginning her professional culinary education, decided to give his daughter a gift of knives.  He asked for advice on which knife.  Since he didn't ask what would make a better gift, it would have been presumptuous to have suggested something else. 

 

Fourth and Finally:

Why Korin?  Why not Chef Knives to Go, Epicurean Edge, or Japanese Knife Imports for instance?   Actually, considering that Korin is more than likely to recommend one of their house-brand Togiharu lines for student use (which aren't very good), I'd say Korin is NOT a good place for advice.  

 

BDL

post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

 

Third:

The OP, proud father of a young woman beginning her professional culinary education, decided to give his daughter a gift of knives.  He asked for advice on which knife.  Since he didn't ask what would make a better gift, it would have been presumptuous to have suggested something else. 

 

Quite the contrary. Sometimes the best advice isn't what you want to hear. Forcing the issue and getting his daughter something she doesn't want or doesn't like won't do him or her any favors. If the spectrum of like or dislike were much larger, then I could see suggesting something specific. But using knives, by your own admission, are something that each person needs to decide upon. Not decided for you. I'm not saying your advice isn't good or knowledgable. It is. Maybe the gift is a certificate and a link to this thread. 

 

The first chef's knife I ever owned was a gift(with a coin!!) from a culinary student with much more experience than I. It was a good introductory knife for someone who didn't know how to chop an onion, but after having used it for a while and gained more experience, I would never have purchased it myself.

post #39 of 44

if you want a specific brand of knife i would reccomend MAC only issues i have with them is you need to hone them more often and they can rust easily other than that no complaints

they are sharp as all hell sliced through the tip of my finger one time it was so sharp i barley felt it. the balance and weight for both the 10' and 8' french knives are great the boning knife they have comes with its own "sheath" it has good flexibility and easy to control. they have alot of knives but those are my favorite ones.

post #40 of 44

Spammar,

 

All of the MAC series are made from stainless alloys.  Gotta ask:  What are you doing to rust them?

 

BDL

post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Spammar,

 

All of the MAC series are made from stainless alloys.  Gotta ask:  What are you doing to rust them?

 

BDL

if youre running around and forget to dry them and forget to dry them in some spectacular lapse of judgement MAC knives do rust in beads but using powdered bar polish works since its non-toxic and a the rust stays on the surface (I prefer bar keepers friend)

it's actually it is not staniless anymore they now use a mix of molybdenum and steel, molybdenum can rust.

steel and chromium are what make stainless but chromium is lower quality than molybdenum 

post #42 of 44

All steel is an alloy composed of -- at least -- iron and carbon.  All modern stainless steels also include chromium.  In the old days, some stainless had nickel instead, and modern austenitic stainless includes a substantial component of nickel as well as stainless.  The current international standard for a steel alloy to be called "stainless" requires a minimum of 13% chromium (by weight).

 

Almost all contemporary stainless steel with any pretension to quality, is "moly steel."  Moly is added to stainless steels to improve resistance to improve strength and hardness.  It increases corrosion resistance, and does not increase it.  A couple of examples of very rust resistant moly steels include the nearly ubiquitous X50CrMoV15 used by Victorinox, Wusthof and most German makers; and Global's Cromova 18 which is so stainless it could be used for dive knives.

 

As far as I know, all three of the alloys MAC employs are stainless, and each contains 13% chromium.  

 

It's more likely that you're getting some sort of crud deposits on your knife than actual corrosion, but I can't tell for sure without seeing, feeling and cleaning the knife.  Unfortunately, "stainless" doesn't mean it can't be rusted or stained given enough abuse.  Stainless or not, you should take better care of your knives. 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 6/3/13 at 7:46am
post #43 of 44

I cant help forgetting every now and then it ends up looking somewhat like this if I forget to dry my knife   by the way this is not any of my knives i got the picture from google 

 

edit: the stainless knives I have can handle air drying without the affect happening above ^ that's why i assume it is rust 

post #44 of 44
Contact with other, less stainless stuff, and/or heavily damaged surface. In fact, stainless steel is not stainless at all, but has a thin layer - patina - of free chromium which appears in a pleasant shiny and relatively resistant form. Gross neglect.
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