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Walnut sauce? - Page 2

post #31 of 36

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #32 of 36

May I recommend the use of a bit of black walnut extract from either Fantes.com or Lorannoils.com just to intensify the flavors and colors.  Great stuff that'll lend a little bit o' hand to the flavors.


Edited by kokopuffs - 5/20/13 at 3:38pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #33 of 36

I made foodnfoto's walnut pesto yesterday and it was awesome!  Served it with four-cheese ravioli (store bought) and my husband's reaction was "are you sure there's no meat in this?????"

 

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #34 of 36

Thanks KouKou!

I'm so glad you liked it.

We get a pumpkin ravioli at one of the farmers markets that we participate in and toss it with this walnut pesto with some wilted baby kale. Totally yummy and satisfying.

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post #35 of 36

Just now I remembered a Turkish recipe for chicken in a creamy walnut sauce.  I don't know if it might be interesting in these contexts or for ravioli.  A woman I knew  back in the 70s, had studied at the university in Ankara and made a chicken dish that had a creamy sauce made with old bread soaked in chicken broth and pounded walnuts, all creamed together in the mortar.  Having looked into Medieval cookery, i found this sort of thing was very common in europe in the middle ages though usually with almonds.  It was very nice.  I can see if i can find her recipe if you're interested. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

Just now I remembered a Turkish recipe for chicken in a creamy walnut sauce.  I don't know if it might be interesting in these contexts or for ravioli.  A woman I knew  back in the 70s, had studied at the university in Ankara and made a chicken dish that had a creamy sauce made with old bread soaked in chicken broth and pounded walnuts, all creamed together in the mortar.  Having looked into Medieval cookery, i found this sort of thing was very common in europe in the middle ages though usually with almonds.  It was very nice.  I can see if i can find her recipe if you're interested. 

 

Using bread as a sauce thickener is found throughout my cook book of medieval cooking.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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