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Looking for a type of culinary job that is 9-5 5 days a week. - Page 4

post #91 of 105

I will never forget a Kid who interned with me..... " I thought the Chef job was going to be easy" Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

post #92 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwebb37 View Post
 

I just graduated culinary school, and had a job at a country club. I worked there for 2 days and then quit because the hour and a half commute 5 days a week was tough especially getting home at midnight. I'm wanting to find a culinary job from 9 am to 5 pm. I hear that the marriot hotels are similar to that. Any ideas?


may i ask how old you are?

 

 

and just where is it you are attending culinary school?

post #93 of 105
Everyone's gotta do their time on nights. The day shift isn't all it's cracked up to be
post #94 of 105

WHERE IS A GOOD RESTAURANT TO APPLY TO AFTER YOU GRADUATE CULINARY SCHOOL? EVERY RESTAURANT WANTS MORE THEN A YEAR EXPERIENCE AND THEY DONT EVEN COUNT THE 4 MONTHS OF EXTERNSHIP. 

 

I BEEN SEARCHING AND SEARCHING FOR THE BEST ONE IN CONNECTICUT TO WORK AT AND NO LUCK BECAUSE I GUESS BEING A FRESH GRADUATE WITH JUST EXTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE ISNT ENOUGH THATS 15 MONTHS ALL IN TOTAL SHOULDNT IT BE FAIR? 

post #95 of 105


Maybe he can go to Fantasy World at the Orlando Disney Resort

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #96 of 105

I have a 9-5 job 85% of the time. I work at a private upscale club that isn't open for dinner. Lunch rush is usually 2 hours long. We do a lot of private parties in season, so from Nov-Feb I'm usually here 3 nights a week. It took me 15 years to find a job like this. The pay is decent, but not stellar.  Personal Time > $$$$$

post #97 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefyari View Post
 

WHERE IS A GOOD RESTAURANT TO APPLY TO AFTER YOU GRADUATE CULINARY SCHOOL? EVERY RESTAURANT WANTS MORE THEN A YEAR EXPERIENCE AND THEY DONT EVEN COUNT THE 4 MONTHS OF EXTERNSHIP. 

 

I BEEN SEARCHING AND SEARCHING FOR THE BEST ONE IN CONNECTICUT TO WORK AT AND NO LUCK BECAUSE I GUESS BEING A FRESH GRADUATE WITH JUST EXTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE ISNT ENOUGH THATS 15 MONTHS ALL IN TOTAL SHOULDNT IT BE FAIR? 

 

 

YOUR POST IS A CLASSIC EXAMPLE OF WHY CULINARYT SCHOOLS SHOLULDN'T ADMIT STUIDENTS WITHOUT ANY PRIOR WORKING EXPERIEICE.  COULD YOU PLEASE SHOW THIS THREAD AND YOUR RESPONSE TO YOUR SCHOOL'S RECRUTING AND AMIN STAFF?

 

thanks ever so much....

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #98 of 105

 
Try a catering company who specializes in corporate events.

I've owned one here in Toronto 22 years and occasionlly would hire ambitious graduates to  give them a start in the field.

If you'd like some tips on how to approach a potential employer in the field and succeed in getting a break, send me a message.

 

Good luck.

post #99 of 105
What I find hard to understand is the various posts by the OP on the last page.
"How does a fine dining restaurant work? Does the chef tell you what to cook?"

Umm...doesn't these culinary school programs teach this stuff? And perhaps more importantly, why is this kid going into hospitality if he has absolutely no idea how it works? Has he ever been to a restaurant, talked to a chef, read a cookbook?

He wants to be like Gordon Ramsey, only 9 to 5, thanks.
What are the names of his books? One, I'm sure, is called "Google is Your Friend "

Who pays more? Hilton or Marriott? Well, since we're talking 9-5, both pay the housekeeping staff fairly poorly. It's in Gordon's books, I'm sure.

Sounds to me like the Food Network has a lot to answer for.
post #100 of 105

OMG  thats a good one.

post #101 of 105

I started to work at a casual 24/7 restaurant in NYC about a month ago. The place isn't bad, mostly because it's a landmark, and everybody knows about it, and they usually say, man, the food is awesome. So, I'm just trying to say that it is not a fine dining place but neither it is a "shitty diner". It's crazy busy, and I am sort of a short order cook. I love the craziness, and even if I don't learn fine skills, I'm learning something that is maybe more important - how to multitask and stay focused tor hours without even a minute break. At first I thought I wouldn't be able to do it. But it's been a month and I'm still there. Wow!

 

Now, after this maybe a bit too long introduction - I do work 8-hour shifts, but those shifts are intense, I would say extremely intense. Other cooks work 8-hour shifts, but also some 11-hour shifts, of even 13-hour shifts (graveyard - it's a little slower, but it is still no vacation). And I am ready to work those longer shifts, just hoping I could physically do it, I mean stay focused, and not get injured (I have some shoulder problems, and I've heard that back problems are the bane of being a chef). One interesting think. When I was interviewing for the job, I let them know that I don't want to work Sundays. I was almost sure that this would be a deal breaker, but they just said, OK. I still can't believe it. I'm so grateful, and it just shows me that if someone has an important scheduling requirements, everything is possible. For me it's a Sunday off. But no more.

 

So, I think that 9-5 goal is a bad approach, especially if it's a goal in itself. And the so called "quality of life" ingredient - what it really means? That all one wants is ease and leisure? Seems a bit selfish, and not that inspiring after all. Kinda lame, I would say.

 

But I'm not a chef, just an aspiring line cook. I was told -  be a line cook for a year at least, and if you can do it, then you maybe think about going to a culinary school. I took that advice. Still, how a line cook can ever afford going to a culinary school eludes me. The pay is pretty bad  (I used to make about three time more by the hour, but wanted to cook... ). I'm doing this hoping to learn, to build a stamina, and somehow, eventually become an excellent line cook, and then who knows, maybe a chef. I've been always told that I am very creative. For the time being I try not to think about it too much.


Edited by kbuff - 4/5/16 at 1:23am
post #102 of 105
As a restaurant and function centre FOH manager, mostly in high end places, I'm never short of my surprised look when interviewing for staff.
"Oh. And I don't really want to work nights, and weekends are when I go out partying, so I don't want to work those either..."
"Ummm, okay. So why do you want to work in hospitality?"
"Oh, cos it's heaps fun and you get to travel all over the world and meet, like, Jamie Oliver!"
post #103 of 105

9-5 doesnt even exist in white collar jobs much

 

 

if u want 9-5 then get into tech industry...only there u work 3-4 hours daily and chill the rest

post #104 of 105

I work in a hotel. Breakfast shifts are 5:30 am - 2:00 pm, If Banquet cooks are in they would usually work until 2:00 pm... starting time is dependent on banquet breakfast business... could be 6am could be 9am.. lol

 

The only person in my kitchen who works a consistent 8am-3:30 pm day is my full time steward!

Whenever possible use local products, be it produce, meat, cheese, wine or beer! 

And local here means within the two counties near us!

Our guests will appreciate it and possibly return because of it!

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Whenever possible use local products, be it produce, meat, cheese, wine or beer! 

And local here means within the two counties near us!

Our guests will appreciate it and possibly return because of it!

Reply
post #105 of 105

I have 21 personal chefs that all work 9-5 Monday through Friday, with the occasional (1-2 times month) optional evening or weekend party that pays automatic overtime. We don't always have an opening, but we are always accepting resumes in anticipation of the next one. Current openings in Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Chicago, Des Moines, Omaha and Kansas City. We are also interview for upcoming openings in Denver, Wichita, Minneapolis/St. Paul and St. Louis.

 

We look for up and coming, overworked/underpaid line cooks with a degree and 3+ years experience in a scratch kitchen, post school. With more experience, no degree needed. 

 

Daytime, weekday hours are common (not 9-5, more like 5 or 6 to 2) in many food service sectors like Business and Industry, Education, Senior Services, Hospitals. 100's of thousands of jobs in those sectors across the country. The trade-off with those is that you don't often get to do any real cooking. It's mostly assembling standard recipes. Our chefs get to cook their own food.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
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