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Question for chef's!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I am really new to the business( I've been a line cook for almost a year) and was wondering why my chef only yells at 3 people in the kitchen particularly during service. His sous, another young line cook, and myself. If another cook drags an order or screws up they dont get yelled at. Keep in mind I am on the pizza station (the beginners station) and the other cook is on the grill station( the station you go to after garde manger), so we are all at completely different levels in the restaurant not to mention I am the only girl to get yelled at. Out of curiosity, is there a reason for this?
post #2 of 15

Some people are already performing at their peak level and riding them would do no good as they can't improve. If he rides you, I would take it as a compliment that he sees the potential you have for improvement. Onward and upward. Of course there is the outside chance that he is just a jerk, but why look at it like that when the other view point is more palatable. chef.gif Yes a compliment is what it is!

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 15
Definitely agree with cheflayne, they push you to make you better!
post #4 of 15

Lol , my chef rides me all the time , but outside the kitchen we are best friends....

In the kitchen there is a need of urgency and timing and skill , if they are riding you its because they want you to get better , you should be worried when they arent riding you , probably means they stopped caring. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #5 of 15

I'm gonna play the BS card here.   In my 40-some odd years of cooking, I've never seen the value of "riding" anyone.  I've never taken it from a boss, and I've never dished it out as a boss.  If I want someone to get better, I'll teach them better.  If someones causing a difficulty and/or getting on my nerves, I'll switch them off and put them somewhere less painful.  I kinda think that those who yell the most just have the smallest equipment in their pants and a serious Napoleon complex to go with.  

 

 

* I put that right up there with the "Grammar Police" on internet BBs. 

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I'm gonna play the BS card here.   In my 40-some odd years of cooking, I've never seen the value of "riding" anyone.  I've never taken it from a boss, and I've never dished it out as a boss.  If I want someone to get better, I'll teach them better.  If someones causing a difficulty and/or getting on my nerves, I'll switch them off and put them somewhere less painful.  I kinda think that those who yell the most just have the smallest equipment in their pants and a serious Napoleon complex to go with.  


This.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post  I kinda think that those who yell the most just have the smallest equipment in their pants and a serious Napoleon complex to go with.  

 

So your advice to her would be what?

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #8 of 15

The OP asked this: "Out of curiosity, is there a reason for this?", not for advice.   I stated, as you quoted, what I thought the reason was.   My advice, otoh, would be to take the head chef on the side and explain that I don't really take so well to being yelled at, and that maybe it would be better to find a different way to communicate with me.

post #9 of 15

Cool, thanks. Standing up for oneself certainly clears the air and lets others know how we feel about a situation and potentially what our boundaries are. However the downside is that if the chef is a yelling type, he probably won't be overly receptive to input, but you never know until you try. As a plan of action, it certainly should cut to the chase at any rate.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #10 of 15
I guess different people respond to different learning techniques though.
For me personally I think I needed a chef like that to get where I am now.
Mind you I am/was a young apprentice with attitude & authority problems haha.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicStone View Post

I guess different people respond to different learning techniques though.

Recognizing that no one approach works for all people is definitely one of the keys to being a a good leader. It is all about matching up round holes and round pegs. Finding the motivation triggers for different individuals in order to meld a cohesive team.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #12 of 15

OK.   I think I'm gonna puke.    Too much hand-holding.

post #13 of 15

As a female, you already have an ...unspoken...advantage when it comes to being

singled out negatively. It's something all male bosses subconsciously keep in

the back of their mind (or should) when a female employee is facing them saying

"Im not happy with how you're treating me, and me alone."

So it  may help to keep that in mind when collecting the gumption to speak

with him about his behavior. smile.gif

post #14 of 15

Take it in good stride, unless you truly think your chef is a jerk and is yelling to yell. I often give the cooks with the most potential the hardest time, because I know they can handle what I'm trying to instruct them on. Make them better. It's the cooks that didnt listen or who i saw as hacks who got the minimum amount of attention, negative or not.  I've learned that this is obviously not the best way to create a structured and strong kitchen, but thats my experience.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I'm gonna play the BS card here.   In my 40-some odd years of cooking, I've never seen the value of "riding" anyone.  I've never taken it from a boss, and I've never dished it out as a boss.  If I want someone to get better, I'll teach them better.  If someones causing a difficulty and/or getting on my nerves, I'll switch them off and put them somewhere less painful.  I kinda think that those who yell the most just have the smallest equipment in their pants and a serious Napoleon complex to go with.  

 

 

* I put that right up there with the "Grammar Police" on internet BBs. 

 

Agreed, with every fiber of my feet. 

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