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Treating Staff Fairly

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
New to the website would like some advise about what to do about an employer who not treating staff with fairness
post #2 of 12

What's your situation?

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Iam the head chef working for owners
post #4 of 12

That's a real bad situation.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Yeah I know , the under mining is hard but yesterday the owner took it to a whole new level was given wrong information About start time had two abusive phone calls , then when I tried to explain my situation was told I don't want to hear it and then told t get over it ( even though I was filing in so her husband could go away on a boys weekend and working a sixth day on a not so good salary ) would like to know what other people think of this and what they would do
post #6 of 12

I would be looking for another job. These people don't respect you. Sounds like your time is based on their personal lives. Is there another cook or sous that can cover some of the shifts?

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post

What's your situation?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wozza View Post

Iam the head chef working for owners

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post

That's a real bad situation.

lol.gif

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by wozza View Post

Iam the head chef working for owners

Sounds to me like you are the "head cook" rather than a chef, in other words, you are the Foreman, not the Superintendent.

 

Or, in military terms, you're the SFC, not the First Sergent

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #9 of 12

Really?  The owners of the restaurant you work at are difficult to work with?  Nooooooooooo, that's just unreal.  Seriously though, suck it up or get out of dodge.  The restaurant industry is practically flypaper for people with difficult personalities- it's not summer camp, and shifts do not end with everyone holding hands and singing kumbaya.  They end with whiskey, because we're adults, damnit.  When I've been in situations where the environment becomes untenable, I re-examine the reasons I took the job in the first place, if those reasons still fit with my current goals, and what other options I'd consider pursuing.  We've all stayed in jobs we disliked too long, but my best advice to you is to be brave and go after what you really want.  I wouldn't have the job I have now, which is a billion times better than my last one, if I hadn't done exactly that.

post #10 of 12

I'm in a "treating staff fairly" situation myself.  And I've decided to stick it out as although I've been working in the same place for nine months, we've had a new chef for the past two months.  He comes with a reputation and lots of press that brings guests in, but seems to have no concern for staffing or scheduling.  I thought my 50 to 55 hour weeks (which, I make hourly as a line cook) was temporary, but the place is making so much money and the cooks are paid so poorly that time and a half is not a concern.  55 hours is one thing, but doing it when you are continuously short staffed is taxing.  Let alone being demanded perfection...or "do I have to get someone else in here to do your job?" --which is a BS empty threat, as we cant seem to get anyone to stay working in our kitchen for longer than two weeks.  

 

Toughing it out a little longer though.  Against my better judgement, and maybe because I secretly like the abuse, I don't know. 

 

Losing our sous in two weeks, which is going to be interesting (read: horrible.)

post #11 of 12
That was one of the main reasons I left the diner...how the owners treated the staff. I've never been so poorly treated in my life and It was affecting my family life so I got out and I'm glad I did.

I think you need to decide what is best for you and if leaving this place is the answer then go for it. Not every cook can work in every kitchen..
OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimmyChanga View Post

55 hours is one thing, but doing it when you are continuously short staffed is taxing.  Let alone being demanded perfection.

As an hourly, 55 hour weeks happen because you are short staffed, not for any other reason; but yes they are taxing. Paying overtime kills bottom lines and no successful operation does it on a regular basis on purpose. Perceived perfection is always to be the norm, short staff or not. The guests pay full price, short staff or not, kitchen overtime or not, they deserve our best. Good enough, never is.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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