or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tiramisu problems

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Ok, this is embarrassing, but I'm having trouble with a tiramisu recipe. I've done it fine for 2 months at my new job, but the last 2 times I made it, it broke. The former pastry chef said she had this problem in the heat of the summer (no AC in the kitchen, door open).

 

So, as per the restaurant's recipe, I whip the yolks, sugar, and marsala over a double boiler bringing it to double in volume, ribbon stage. As per recipe, I add the mascarpone cheese and bring back to double boiler to melt and make smooth. Then I add the whipped heavy cream (this is where it starts to break) then I fold in the meringue (really starts to break). I've done this several times w/o breaking, but now it's a mess.  I'm guessing the cheese mixture is too hot for the cream. I brought it back by warming it up and whipping, but it was way to liquid, lost all it's air.

 

The other pastry chef says to put the cheese mixture in the cooler for a little while before folding in the cream. This sounds reasonable to me. What do you guys think? It's been a long time since I broke anything.

post #2 of 8

Assemble the whole thing in the walk in where its nice and cool.

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

I thought about that Ed. Thank you for the input.

post #4 of 8

I've never heard of heating the mascarpone.  I think that is your problem.  If mascarpone gets too warm just sitting out, it will break.

When I make it, after the sabayon comes off the heat, I will whip it until it cools, then add the mascarpone and beat it in.  Then I fold in whipped cream.  My recipe doesn't use egg whites.  I would guess that if you are adding everything to a hot mixture, it's causing the problems. 

post #5 of 8
The only thing i would be embarrassed about is if it continued....that would get old fast not to mention extremely frustrating. I agree that your sabayon is too hot when you add the whipped cream and the meringue, but you've already figured that out. The sabayon needs to be cooled down THOROUGHLY before adding either.....chilled down in the walk in is even better. I agree with rlyv that heating the mascarpone may not be helping you, but i don't see it as detrimental as adding the cream and egg whites to a hot or even warm mixture. I always whisk the mascarpone first to smooth it and just to make it more workable before adding it to the egg/ sugar mix, but then again the recipe I use is completely different and doesn't call for making a sabayon first. Try chilling down your sabayon first before adding the whipped cream and meringue and i think you should be fine.
what's amazing to me is that you ever got it to work in the first place over the past few months.....maybe you've just been really lucky or are very driven, or both! wink.gif

joey
Edited by durangojo - 5/21/13 at 5:11pm

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Joey and Rlyv. thanks for the advice. When I was searching for a solution online, I ran across someone mentioning the mascarpone can break easily.

 

This is frustrating because I haven't made tiramisu much in my career. Not a fan of the dessert and I worked with the French mostly. But, I am determined to get this right.

 

Thanks again for the encouraging words of advice. redface.gif

post #7 of 8
I have a recipe like that mbar. Just pull the cheese out when you start the recipe so it can temper. Add the cheese first to your mixer and using the paddle mix for 30 seconds to smooth it out. Then add the sabayon. Mix just to combine. In this case it's not so mush the heat as the agitation that's causing it to break. Good luck.
post #8 of 8

I've had mascarpone break heavy whip in the mixer when I brought it, (the masc) to room temp, I would take your egg mix. off the heat and add the masc. 1/4 at first, and then fold the remainder in, then the cream, then the whites.  Good Luck!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Pastry Chefs