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salmon poaching

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

alrighty, so just wondering, what are the pros and cons to poaching salmon?  never tried this method, but i need to get myself familiarized with it and would like to try it at work.  flavor, consistency, and time.  thanks for your feedback! smile.gif

post #2 of 16

I don't really think in terms of pros and cons, different cooking techniques just yield different tastes, so each has its own qualities (for example think of raw onion vs sweated onion vs caramelized onion). 

 

  • When poaching, the flavor is cleaner, no caramelization, it's also a lighter dish as you don't need any additional fat to cook the salmon.
  • You can experiment with the poaching medium (water, olive oil, butter, etc....) and add flavors to it (spices, aromatics, herbs, citrus, etc...) which will then be infused into your salmon. 
  • Little chances of the salmon drying out. 
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

thank you!  actually sounds like exactly what i've been wanting for this dish to be, which is light and clean.  very excited, thank you again!

post #4 of 16

You're welcome! Poached salmon is also very good served cold. 

post #5 of 16

It's very hard to over cook poached Salmon so that's surely a "Pro". If your new to poaching Salmon one technique that is very fast and easy is to slice thin escallops and fan them. You can poach Salmon this way in a very shallow pan and it cooks very fast so for a line cook that's a HUGE plus. This method is also far easier to gage a finished product (just touch it like a steak with your finger tip) Vs trying to tell if a submerged fillet is done perfectly. Better yet, with this presentation you can use a smaller portion of protein so your food cost goes down.

This is a perfect summer dish and goes very well with a Beurre Blanc of any flavor you like.

If your going to serve cold I'd consider steaming by putting your fillets on a sheet pan, adding wine or what ever liquid you would like to season your fish with, covering tightly with a quality plastic wrap and then baking at a moderate temperature. This works really well for a buffet or any volume service.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #6 of 16

I tend towards grilling or broiling salmon, but do poach it as well.  Usually the liquid involves water, butter, vermouth, black peppercorns, lemon, dill or tarragon.  If I plan to make a cold salmon salad I poach.  French Fries comments were definitely on the mark.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #7 of 16

I LOVE poaching salmon!  The creamy texture is unbeatable.  I sweat some shallots and garlic in olive oil, deglaze with vermouth and add vegetable stock, salt/pepper.  Slip in my salmon filets and cover.  When it's ready - for me that's still a little raw but warm in the middle) I remove and reduce the sauce.  Add some fresh parsley or whatever herb you like and finish with a knob of butter.  Serve over the salmon.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

i normally pan sear and grill as well, have always been curious about poaching salmon.  again thank you guys for your feedback and suggestions, this is like gold to my brain lol.  i don't have a culinary degree so i rely on learning techniques on my own (i work in a small kitchen for a hotel).  lots of reading and practice!  i wanted to create a dish for summer but wanted something other than seared or grilled, so this is great and seems pretty simple.  thanks again!  

post #9 of 16

  I like to keep the salmon more pinkish in the middle when plating. The sauce that he made is full of flavor. There are so many ways of poaching salmon, this is just one of many , but I thought the plating and sauce you might find interesting, using  his fingertips he gently pulls the salmon apart  effortlessly. Another good point is  to season your water before placing the salmon in the liquid. Just another thought.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #10 of 16

Petals, I'm obsessed with this video, who is this chef?  He has such a calm inviting way of cooking.  Very gentle and makes me want to eat the salmon right away.  Thanks for posting!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #11 of 16

Wiki is not always the best source for info but it does sum up in quick detail some of the information on Michel Roux. If you were to look what they have done to cooking , its just incredible. If there was a gold standard for French cooking , he has it. He reminds me alot of Jacques Pepin, both using distinct products to achieve optimal flavour.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Roux

 

His son , Michel Roux JR. is running La Gavroche in London. Ishbel and Bug know about him.

 

In the offal thread, I posted a dish that was inspired by Michel Roux Jr. The consomme was used with veal (I used the head and tail to extract the flavour) and proceeded to make it following the recipe as he had done. Consomme is not hard, the only tricky thing is the raft. Done wrong, the egg will make your stock cloudy, thus ruined.

Then I proceeded to make a poor attempt at making his dish.

 

I have made many of their dishes. If you look at some of the video's , you can learn alot from both of them. They have many books out , pastry and sauces are just terrific.

 

I'm so happy that you enjoy him (son too) as much as I do.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

In the offal thread, I posted a dish that was inspired by Michel Roux Jr. The consomme was used with veal (I used the head and tail to extract the flavour) and proceeded to make it following the recipe as he had done.

Petals, I happen to have watched Michel Roux Jr. make this consommé "life" on the BBC TV during one of his Masterclasses following the fierce competition "Masterchef, The Professionals".

You sure managed to approach Michel Roux's presentation incredibly close!

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

... He reminds me alot of Jacques Pepin, both using distinct products to achieve optimal flavour.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Roux

 

 

 

Thanks petals, I'll definitely have a look.  I must admit, I don't really enjoy watching Jacques Pepin, his accent is a little too.... slurpy.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #14 of 16

Accents aside, it is the technique that I  appreciate so much. They both were taught at a time when basic knowlegde of French cuisine was fundamental, pursuant of fresh produce and technique was integral to defining them as chefs.

 

Each one adepts a menu ,  mentors the dish forward and they do not  attempt not to override the fine balance of taste without sacrificing taste, of which I have a have great respect for.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #15 of 16

 

Anyone every use a fish poacher

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #16 of 16

yes.

 

they are very handy if you're doing a large whole fish and want it 'big & bold' for presentation.

 

a single side / filet one can easily cut to fit in a big fry pan - but the poacher keeps the fish intact.

be sure it has a tray - (a) so no scorching on the bottom and (b) most important for lifting out....

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