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The only scrambled eggs I'll ever eat

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Perhaps some of you are aware of my strong aversion toward egg yolks from reading other threads. Although I do appreciate a well-prepared recipe containing yolks, so long as I don't taste them, like creme brulee, chocolate mousse, curry chicken salad, and both bernaise and hollandaise sauce, . My husband on the other hand loves egg yolks anyway he can get them. I remember there was a time when I used to love scrambled eggs, or soft boiled eggs with crackers, or soft boiled eggs cut up into a soup where I could dip bread or toast. I don't know why I can't tolerate the direct flavor of yolks anymore.. It happened gradually throughout the years.

 

So last night I got to reading the thread "whats your test for line cooks????" and noticed that quite a few chefs choose to test their potential employees with the simple art of cooking an egg. Fair enough. Anyone who calls him/herself a cook/chef should know how to properly cook an egg. I'm not one of those people who thinks cooking eggs is beneath me. Eggs are very delicate and take a learned hand to make them just right in their many ways, and I remember someone on CT mentioned chef Ramsay's scrambled eggs. I looked it up on YT and decided to try them and cook my husband to a midnight treat.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUP7U5vTMM0

 

 

Those eggs were in.cre.di.ble. I almost didn't even taste them because I was afraid the yolk was going to overpower my palate, which is what often happens when I identify yolk in a dish, but I saw how my husbands eyes were rolling in the back of his head, and decided to give them a little sniff....they didn't smell yolky, then I decided to give them just a little taste, and boy they were so creamy and heavenly good. Not yolky at all. Just egg heaven.

 

 

I used cabot sour cream instead of creme fraiche, and I didn't have chives.

 

 

Those are the only scrambled eggs I'll ever eat.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #2 of 28

I've made this several times, using sour cream mostly because creme fraiche is not so easy to get.  It's heavenly indeed but I like eggs anyway I can get them (except overcooked!!)

 

My latest obsession is soft boiled, still warm, peeled and held in hand, but in to the yolk that is just started to firm up but still oozy.  If Gordon's eggs are heavenly, soft boiled eggs are sinful.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 

I can get creme fraiche here but it's $6.00 for a small tub. Cabot is a really good quality replacement for simple dishes like this. I'll only get CF when I want to make something extra special, or I have to cook something on higher heat since CF doesn't split.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #4 of 28

! pint heavy cream plus 1-2 tablespoons live culture buttermilk plus 48 hours or so at room temperature = creme fraiche.
 

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post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 

Yes, I have the formula but have been either too lazy or too busy to make it. I think it's time for me to finally try it. smiles.gif

 

That reminds me...McCraken,  where in the market can I locate citric acid powder and rennet? I've been wanting to try my hand at making fresh mozzarella (never have, and never seen it done) but for the life of me I can't find those two ingredients, and when I ask someone at the market they look at me like I'm trying to make a home-made bomb.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #6 of 28

Try your local health food store, that's what worked for me...

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post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 

ahhh! thanks. Didn't even think of that.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #8 of 28

I am in the I hate runny scrambled eggs camp, cook them til done!

post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 

They looks runny but they;re not. they are actually cooked all the way through. What makes them look runny (but in fact are creamy) is the butter in the egg, and then the creme fraiche folding in.

 

 

I know what you mean tho. I went to a nice restaurant for brunch last fall with my husband, and ordered scrambled egg whites and they came runny, with the albumen still wiggling in parts of the egg. I wanted to vomit. I'll never go there again. It was pure laziness, since me and my husband were one of two couples there.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #10 of 28

Its a texture thing, they will look and feel runny

post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

! pint heavy cream plus 1-2 tablespoons live culture buttermilk plus 48 hours or so at room temperature = creme fraiche.
 

Hey Pete. How's it going?

 

You can also add 1 tablespoon of lemon juice to a cup minus a tablespoon of milk, wait 15 min and it works as a buttermilk substitute. Don't know how it would affect your instant creme fraiche recipe though. 


Edited by jake t buds - 5/27/13 at 2:54pm
post #12 of 28

Jake, the Creme Fraiche NEEDS the live culture in the buttermilk, I think it is called llactobacillus acidophilus, or some such.

 

Acidified milk works as a buttermilk substitute when dealing with leavening agents that are basic in nature.
 

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post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

Jake, the Creme Fraiche NEEDS the live culture in the buttermilk, I think it is called llactobacillus acidophilus, or some such.

 

Acidified milk works as a buttermilk substitute when dealing with leavening agents that are basic in nature.
 

I figured. Isn't creme fraiche like yoghurt?

post #14 of 28

To my thinking, it is more like sour cream, but much tastier!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jake t buds View Post

I figured. Isn't creme fraiche like yoghurt?

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post #15 of 28

Anywhere there's sufficient Mexican population for Mexican markets... crema fresa = creme fraiche in every way but price.

 

BDL 

post #16 of 28

I made it once, wonderful buttery taste, but like crap once they get cold, the way my significant other usually eats eggs.  I'll make them again for myself, but not giving up french omlets.

 

Rick

post #17 of 28

On one of Mr. Ramsey's episodes, he touted the use of butter when cooking/frying/sauteing an egg - as opposed to bacon grease or some other nondescript fat.   "...Have you ever tasted an egg...an egg cooked in real butter....????????"      And that's a paraphrase.  Well, I tried using butter and never went back to anything else when it comes to cooking eggs for breakfast fwiw.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

On one of Mr. Ramsey's episodes, he touted the use of butter when cooking/frying/sauteing an egg - as opposed to bacon grease or some other nondescript fat.   "...Have you ever tasted an egg...an egg cooked in real butter....????????"      And that's a paraphrase.  Well, I tried using butter and never went back to anything else when it comes to cooking eggs for breakfast fwiw.

For scrambled eggs I agree. However when fried over easy I want nothing but olive oil as a preferable preferences. Just recently there was a thread about eggs and someone mentioned basted eggs. I have grown up eating eggs basted in olive oil.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post


For scrambled eggs I agree. However when fried over easy I want nothing but olive oil as a preferable preferences. Just recently there was a thread about eggs and someone mentioned basted eggs. I have grown up eating eggs basted in olive oil.

What does olive oil have over butter?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #20 of 28

The only time I don't use butter is if I happen to have duck fat on hand and I'm cooking potatoes in it.  Then I tend to use the duck fat instead of butter.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #21 of 28

I grew up with olive oil as the default egg frying oil. For omelets and everything else. Fried eggs? Great. I've learned to love butter for omelets. 

post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake t buds View Post

I grew up with olive oil as the default egg frying oil. For omelets and everything else. Fried eggs? Great. I've learned to love butter for omelets. 


Fried eggs: over easy or sunny side.  As opposed to poached.

But why switch to butter for omelets?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #23 of 28

I only use olive oil for omelets and over-easies because I find the taste of butter does not in general integrate  as well with eggs.

 

Rick


Edited by Rick Alan - 6/23/13 at 1:57am
post #24 of 28

deleted.


Edited by Antilope - 7/11/13 at 11:27am
post #25 of 28
I have Dualit toaster, kettle and coffee machines. Love them all. Toaster makes the best toast, imo.smile.gif
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antilope View Post

Did you notice in the egg video, Ramsay was using a Dualit toaster in the background? You have to look quick. Expensive little critter made in the U.K, but they work well.

Most toasters now days don't work well. This is just speculation, but could this be because most toasters are designed and manufactured in a country and culture that doesn't consume that much toast? China.

A lot of things are manufactured in China. That doesn't mean that the product was conceptualized or designed there. In general a lot of appliances are being designed nowadays to break down quickly so that you can spend more money and buy a new one. Also they use cheap materials to keep their cost down. This has nothing p do with Chinese people or how much toast they eat.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #27 of 28

deleted.


Edited by Antilope - 7/11/13 at 11:27am
post #28 of 28

@kokopuff : I dunno. Because the flavor suits an omelet better than olive oil? Frittata's are great with olive oil, as are tortilla -a spanish potato omelet - but a classic french omelet seems better with butter. It's a matter of taste, I guess.

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