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frenchchef daily cooking tips

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Hi!! my name is Frederic; i live in Paris France and im a cooking lover for many years....i will start this new thread and post daily cooking tips....sorry for my really  bad English!!

post #2 of 19
Thread Starter 

when you find your dish too salty simply add a tiny bit of vinegar and a bit of powder sugar and your dish will get back to his "natural" taste. bon appetit!!!

post #3 of 19

More tips! More tips! We need tips!

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 

HOW TO DO A LIGHT SALAD SAUCE: just take a fat free yogurt, mix it with lemon juice, fresh aromatic herbs, salt and Pepper...bon appetit!!!

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 

HOW TO CUT A ROAST BEEF NICELY: after being cooked, dont cut it right away. just put it on "cutting plate" and cover it with foil paper for around 5mn. it will keep the juice inside the roast beef and wont leak on the plate...voila!!!...bon appetit!!!

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post

More tips! More tips! We need tips!

i will do my best but feel free to give me also good tips if you have some!!!bonne fin de soiree!!

post #7 of 19

How to pull out  pork ribs membrane. Initiate with a chopstick, move laterally to make some space, and use your fingers to finish the work.

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post

use your fingers to finish the work.

 

...and if your fingers are slippery, use a paper towel to grab the membrane - then pull. smile.gif

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 

HOW TO KNOW IF YOU MICROWAVE IS WAVETIGHT(not exactly sure of the translation): just put your cellular phone in it....call it...and if your phone doesnt ring it means your microwave is wavetight!!

post #10 of 19

Weird tip. Made me remember this joke:

 

−This TV is sh**.  Almost no image, no shows, no movies, no sport channels  and the remote control doesn't work at all.

−Grand pa… you're looking at the microwave.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by olalachef View Post

HOW TO KNOW IF YOU MICROWAVE IS WAVETIGHT(not exactly sure of the translation): just put your cellular phone in it....call it...and if your phone doesnt ring it means your microwave is wavetight!!

WARNING!   Don't turn on the microwave with the phone inside. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #12 of 19
Here's a tip for long time consuming simmerings or poachings or confits whenever your stove can't get a very low temperature (which is the norm in home kitchens). Even using a diffuser many times the cooking is uneven or too strong. A friend (knife maker, not a cook) came up with this simple idea that works like charm.
Here's my aluminum diffuser with three hex nuts on top. If you don't have a diffuser (and you should) you can use an inverted flat cast iron pan.
 

 

Put the pan or pot over the nuts. This way you get only radiation from the stove, and a little convection, but almost no conduction. You can change the thickness of the nuts and you'll get different temperatures. I've been doing many confits and simmerings (Siduris cauliflower pasta,  pil-pil, stews, eggs, etc.) with great success. 
 

 


Edited by Ordo - 8/29/13 at 8:56am
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #13 of 19

You can also use a simple wire rack.

 

 

 

Or a wire:

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #14 of 19

Great tip Ordo ! Hidden talents.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #15 of 19

Here's another tip for simmering on low temperatures: 

 

Many home oven have, for each gas burner, a knob that starts on full heat then slowly decreases to low heat, where the knob stops. Problem is, even at the location where the knob stops, the lowest heat is often too high for simmering - even with some of the new burners that label this position as "simmering". 

 

The solution is to turn the knob to full heat, then very slowly turn it the other way, as if you wanted to shut off the burner. Just go slow and you'll see the flames go smaller. 

post #16 of 19

Yep FF. And if even so the temp is too high you can open the oven a little bit. Here's a useful one. Use aluminum foil in your stoves, as pros do.  Less of a mess to clean and better radiation from the shiny surface.

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post

Yep FF. And if even so the temp is too high you can open the oven a little bit. 

Open the oven? I was talking about stove top gas burners here... no oven??

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

Here's another tip for simmering on low temperatures: 

 

Many home oven have, for each gas burner, a knob that starts on full heat then slowly decreases to low heat, where the knob stops. Problem is, even at the location where the knob stops, the lowest heat is often too high for simmering - even with some of the new burners that label this position as "simmering". 

 

The solution is to turn the knob to full heat, then very slowly turn it the other way, as if you wanted to shut off the burner. Just go slow and you'll see the flames go smaller. 

 

Sorry. I read that and misinterpreted you. Anyway your tip is perfect for stoves and ovens as well.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #19 of 19
Ha! I see, sorry for the confusion. Should have said stovetops.
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