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How to train a cook on a busy station

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Tonight I'm in charge of training someone new to take over a busy pasta station when I leave.  He trained last night, but during the rush I jumped in because I wasn't confident that he could handle the pop. 

 

Last night we did 200 covers and tonight we already have 200 on the books so we'll probably do between 250-300.

 

Should I stand back and let him run the station while correcting and giving advice or would it be better to have someone run the stove and the other plate/run point?

 

Any other general tips on training for a busy station would be useful.

post #2 of 5

I think you should give him the rains on prep and the into the beginning of service, guiding him appropriately.  Once you see the rush on its way jump in and help execute the food.  In my opinion, no matter how good of a cook you are it's tough to pick up the nuances of a new station.  As long as he seems to putting out the quality of food that is required, let him do his thing while making sure the station is clean, pasta baskets are tapped of old pasta, the water is salted, etc.  Make him mindful of everything and teach him exactly how you do things. Oh, and make sure he tastes everything, always. 

 

My biggest problem when training the new person is leaving it up to interpretation.  There are 100 ways to do any one thing, some better than others, but its important to teach someone how YOU do it, not how you've seen someone else do it.  It causes confusion.

post #3 of 5
I think an important thing during training on a busy station is full immersion, there's no better way to learn than by fire it toughens the nerves and makes the person either move on or get into it. While training you should absolutely pass on the varying nuances of that particular station as well as any paterns as well as any helpful advice for service. If the person is ready to jump head first into a busy station then should prove able to handle the situations that arise with ease and a proper attitude
post #4 of 5

Let him do it ,you just back up if needed

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 5

One of the restaurants I have worked had a very busy sautee station . It would do all the vegetables and sides for an average 100 covers a week day and 200 on a weekend . When we had to fire the Lead Cook (also former sous chef ,recently demoted ) we had to put the sautee guy to the grill since he was the strongest in the line. As a Sous Chef back then I also had to cover his off days. Man... Me and the chef we realized how demanding and  difficult the station was . Our solution was to let the sautee guy train the new guy we hired the way he wanted. First 3-4 shifts the new guys was doing all the prep , replenishing the mis en place during the service and doing only 3 sides. After 2 days they have swapped the roles and the new guy was doing the most of the cooking and the sautee guy was replenishing the mis en place. 4th day he started helping him less , 5th day the new guy was pulling the station by himself on a busy day without any problem.

In short words :yes , throw the newbie into deep end but only after You give them proper training rather than "let hem figure out"

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