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Flaky crusts and scones

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

So, I have been trying to make great scones. it is a goal of mine for some time. I liked the article this month in Fine Cooking so, I started working on them, again. to make the butter nice and flaky, they cut cubes then press between the fingertips. seems a good idea but, apparently, my hands, even the fingertips, are too warm for this to work well.

 

So, I tried something else. I used the flour in the recipe to dust my board, then scattered the butter cubes and added more flour from the recipe. then, I used my rolling pin to flatten everything as much as possible. of course, all of this stuck to the pin and rolling surface. I knew it would and, my plan for that was to make this all nice and flat and then scraping from the pin AND from the rolling table. This is the first time I have tried this but I wondered if any of you had done so and what you thought?  Seems, so far, to have worked, in theory. the dough looks good. so, we'll see how the process working in practice in a few hours.

 

I am also looking at using a pizza cutter to cut the scones rather than a knife. there just never seem to be knives long enough, or sharp enough to cut the scones without flattening the layers.

post #2 of 13

I don't have a problem using fingers but often opt for the convenience of using a stand mixer.  I find the dough hook works better than paddles to avoid over mixing the butter and flour.

 

The method you describe should work but sounds a bit messy and might be too much work.  I've mixed dough just with a bench scraper and it worked... but was a lot of work compared with the mixer.

post #3 of 13

Another thought....have you ever made them with buttermilk ?

 

 Light an fluffy - no fail. I agree with Brian about the bench scraper. The prep time in making these is about 5 minutes.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

I am about to fill and bake off a Quiche using the smear technique, again in Fine Cooking. the crust, after blind baking, looks as delicate and flaky as advertised. I can't help it, every time a new issue arrives, I have to try most of the recipes and techniques included. I do enjoy reading about cooking!

 

THANKS for the video! Being of Scots descent, I am always in search of the perfect Scone. Haven't found it, yet, but it is always great to see new techniques and processes.

post #5 of 13
I'm Scots. I was taught to make scones by my Granny, who always insisted on holding your wrists under cold, running water to cool your fingers bfore mixing the scone dough and to mix the ingredients as quickly and lightly as possible; my scones are very light!

I'm not sure that there is any science behind this, just centuries of tradition!
post #6 of 13

YES... Cream scone.  Different than a "regular" scone.  I use cream rather than buttermilk actually like them better than "regular" scones.  Easier to make and less clean-up.  VERY TASTY.  No matter which scone or which technique, they don't take long and will be good if not overworked.

 

Re: Cooks Illustrated "smearing"... another great classic technique that CI is bringing to the collective awareness.

 

p.s.  approximately 7/12 Scots here... but had to learn the scone on my own.  :)

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

Well, whether it actually works or not, it makes sense.  cooling your blood will cool your skin and THAT makes sense. I know, living in the Deep South, when the heat becomes oppressive, I can put my wrist under cool water and it cools my entire body. it makes perfect sense that it would work the other way.

 

There are SO many occasions where we know our grandmothers, with little or no formal education, could cure ANYTHING. My grandmother had NEVER heard of the Milliard Reaction but she KNEW that when you had a sunburn, you put vinegar on the burn. Today, we know that vinegar will stop the reaction and that is why it works on burns. I guess the point is, even if we don't understand the why, it is ALWAYS best to listen to grandmother and do things her way<G> She always has a reason even if she does not know it.

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

Well, my Scots blood is long diluted but, it is the major line in my family. My father's family moved to Texas in the late 1800's but had been in Southern TN for a couple of generations. My mom's family has been in this area since they came to this country LONG ago. and, in these areas, most families, like the Scots of the Highlands, stayed within their own culture. So, we have been American for 200 or more years, the origins are Scots as well as Cherokee.

post #9 of 13

The "smearing" technique is an aka for 'fraisage' touted by Julia Child and many many other well experienced chefs.

I cut my scone dough using a baker's bench scraper.  Works fine.

 

For the first time I kneaded my scone dough about 9 or 10 times and it came out fine and very light - and it was my own (EDIT) walnut/raisin scone recipe.

 

FWIW.


Edited by kokopuffs - 5/28/13 at 4:17pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

YES... Cream scone.  Different than a "regular" scone.  I use cream rather than buttermilk actually like them better than "regular" scones.  Easier to make and less clean-up.  VERY TASTY.  No matter which scone or which technique, they don't take long and will be good if not overworked.

 

Please explain the reason why cream scones are easier to "clean-up" than scones using buttermilk.

 

Also I use HEAVY CREAM in my recipe as the added butterfat imparts extra richness.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #11 of 13

Sorry... I must have got my sentences mixed up while editting that message.  I meant that cream scones are easier to clean up that when making butter scones.  I use heavy cream too.

post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 

Black Walnut and Raisin! That sounds like SUCH a wonderful combo! I have loved black walnut since I was a child. we had those trees and I used to dream of those nuts. but, they are SO hard to open, they were usually reserved for very special occasions. I don't have the trees, anymore, but, when I can find the walnuts, I still love them. such a unique and strong flavor. Iespecially like it in Ice Cream, it carries well, even over the extreme cold! I always forget about ordering it, though unless I happen to notice it. it is one of those flavors. YUM! THanks for the happy memory!

post #13 of 13

I'm sorry, let me revise: Walnut/Raisin scones (previous post edited).  A black walnut flavoring/oil has been added to the mixture.  I get the BW flavoring from either FANTES.COM or LorAnn Oils.  And yes, I do include real walnuts in the recipe.  8)


Edited by kokopuffs - 5/28/13 at 5:13pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
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