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Cooking Rocky Mountain 'Oysters'......

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I kid you not...I was asked if i could make them as part of a 50th wedding anniversary luncheon I'm catering for about 100 - 120 guests next month. Seems they had them at their wedding and thought it might be fun.....not in my book, but they have been good and loyal customers for the past 20 years, so I hate to disappoint. i don't have a clue, as in 'not the foggiest' notion of a place to start. Someone told me they have to be peeled first....oh my. If I can make it through this without laughing, crying or puking, I'll be happy. any experience anyone? ideas, suggestions, links and handholding would be so greatly appreciated. I would like to have fun with this....thanks all.

joey

ps...I have heard of them being deep fried but do not have a fryer in my kitchen.

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #2 of 18

My experience is very limited.  The two times I actually made them, I did them as a sort of lemon, caper, white-wine meuniere.  I think they're most often breaded and deep fried, but don't see why -- if you're going to deep fry them -- you couldn't use a tempura or beer batter.  

 

The prep starts like kidneys with soaking.  If you don't soak they can be very bitter.  After soaking, the taste is clean, fresh and not at all funky -- like sweetbreads.  

 

Fresh veal testicles are sold in the sac.  Use a small, pointed, sharp knife to slit the sacs.  Remove the testicles, and discard the sacs.

 

Soaked the testicles in lightly salted water, milk or buttermilk (I prefer milk or buttermilk) in the refrigerator for at least an hour.  Drain and rinse.  Blanche briefly (3 - 5 minute ish) in boiling water.  Remove, drain, cool.  

 

They cook fastest, most evenly, and plate best if they're sliced about 3/8", rather than halved or chunked in large pieces. 

 

To cook, you can:

  1. Flour them lightly by dusting, or more heavily by dredging.  Meuniere and piccatta are good.  I use an unholy hybrid of those and a beurre blanc (or Nantais) -- with parsley, capers, white wine and lemon.  Given that you like to use fruit with meat, you could go veronique.  The downsides to these preps is that none is really large-group friendly, none involves dipping sauces, toothpicks, hot sauce, or any of the other things your group probably wants, and they're probably altogether too damn French;
  2. Three-stage breading ending with flour, flour/corn-meal, bread crumbs, seasoned bread crumbs -- chef Ed would undoubtedly recommend panko, or whatever, but I'm not about to tell you how to bread.  Then shallow or deep fry; or,
  3. Batter -- beer, tempura, or whatever (again, I don't have the [ahem] balls) and deep fry. 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 5/31/13 at 8:06am
post #3 of 18

Breaded and fried is how they do them at the Testicle Festival in Utah. Haven't been to try it out yet.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 18

Shucks.  Too late to make another entry in the offal challenge - I never thought of these.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Could I make a dish similar to braised short ribs with these? My thinking is after all the prep of cleaning and milking i would dredge in seasoned flour, sear then braise with vegetables,red wine and herbs. after baking low and slow and after cooling i would slice them, add demi to the sauce and reheat. Second option was to prepare them 'Marbella' style (dried figs, apricots, sun dried pears,olives, capers,sherry etc.....same thing....bake, slice and reheat..any thoughts?
Would either work?
Yes, although these folks are world travelers, their roots are in Kansas.........wink.gif

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #6 of 18

joey,

 

I get what you're trying to do, and get how much easier it would be to make something in advance and served from a pot (or two), rather than pan-frying for 50.  BUT the mountain oysters won't stand up to a long cook.  You're talking a 15 or 20 minute braise.  If that works for you, maybe something like:

 

  • Preheat a pan to saute temp;
  • Best quality extra virgin olive oil and butter in equal amounts;
  • Thinly sliced onions and leeks;
  • Salt and white pepper;
  • When they start to sizzle, season with S&P, and a bay leaf; 
  • Enough white wine to cover the vegetables, plus a little more;
  • Lower the flame, cover, cook until the raw is off the wine and the aromatics are completely soft;
  • Add some sour cream and the soaked, blanched, sliced testicles;
  • A little fresh, chopped tarragon and dill;
  • Cover and cook at a bare simmer, until the testicles are tender, about 15 or 20 minutes; 
  • Taste and adjust seasoning; finally
  • Refresh the tarragon and dill with a little bit more; and
  • A little parsley as well.

 

Serve garnished with toast made from some sort of really good bread.  I'd go sourdough, or if I were doing my own baking, use the bread basket combination of pumpernickel, pain de campagne, and onion-dill bread, one toast point of each.     

 

I know this is an hysterically funny subject for women, but remember that testicles are delicate.  When you think of building a braise think fish or poultry not short-ribs beef.  Easy does it, don't overcook.  FWIW, they're supposedly very good for breaking down cellulite.

 

Rereading, that recipe looks kinda sorta Baltic.  I dunno.  

 

BDL    

post #7 of 18

Never ate them or made them or served them  .So don't know anything bout them.

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #8 of 18

Joey, you can bet 50 yrs ago they were, sliced, breaded and fried. Many yrs ago, the Elks lodge use to have Rocky Mountain oyster feeds. Thats was the first time I saw them and thank God the last time I saw them...........I would fry them and serve with a Lemon dill cream dipping sauce............ Good luck......Chefbillyb

post #9 of 18

Not a joke, I have made them:

 

Rocky Mountain Oysters On The Half Shell.

 

You can find recipes on-line.

 

dcarch

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
could they be smoked? cool.gif That could seriously work for me.....i can
see them on good bread crostini with a lemon aioli or a spicy remoulade...hmmm.....
I just keep thinking about those wonderful smoked oysters I had in Tomales Bay a few months ago and wondering if I could connect the dots somehow. I do have another idea percolating....something with a southwest flair involving mescal, lime, fire roasted tomatoes., cilantro, cumin maybe chipotle, maybe not......served in corn tortilla cups....maybe blue corn ones...will post when I nail it
joey
Edited by durangojo - 6/1/13 at 11:07am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #11 of 18
Quote:

Second option was to prepare them 'Marbella' style (dried figs, apricots, sun dried pears,olives, capers,sherry etc.....same thing....bake, slice and reheat..any thoughts?

Is that your original idea? To me it sounds an interesting and unique approach to these little ....um....gems. rolleyes.gif

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
...... quote BDL, "FWIW, they're supposedly very good for breaking down cellulite".
   


How many do you suppose one has to eat ? rolleyes.gifcool.gifwink.gif
@ meez....no, the Marbella idea is certainly not an original idea or recipe of mine...simply an adaptation of a Spanish classic I do with chicken thighs....Works great for buffets. The southwest idea spark is from cheflayne.....
Still curious to know if they can be smoked though.....like cold or hot smoked salmon is my thinking.


joey
Edited by durangojo - 6/1/13 at 7:12pm

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #13 of 18

Joey,

 

Most butchers here in Montreal call them "amourettes" and lamb amourettes are very popular.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
..have you or your family made them? how? leave it to the french to find a lovely word like "amourettes"... very apropos really...thanks petals.

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #15 of 18

Joey, I was wondering if this video might help you ?

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Update......Alas, there will be no 'gringo tendergroin', or any other kind for that matter. Price and pack size $7.11 lb./40 lb. case.....who knew? The client mentioned to me that their family would never quit laughing if they knew they actually BOUGHT them!.....seems they have a huge supply back on their ranch.....oh well...it was good mental aerobics.
Thanks to all for taking the time and for your input. wink.gif

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #17 of 18

As in many food stuffs  ingredients, its often most practical to just go harvest your own. You considered that? tongue.gif

post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Meez,
Yet another great reason to live in the southwest.....maybe that's why the cowboys are always smiling. Yippee-yi-ki-yay!!!!! cool.gif

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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