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Gas Griddles. Inconsistent temprature across grill?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hello.

 

I have a flat top electric gas griddle, which i use for making burgers. 

 

1) What is the recommended temprature at which i should keep the patties? Currently my griddle is kept as high as 550 Farenhite!

 

2) I've noticed that there is a pretty significant variation in temprature across the grill. Its highest in the center and quite low at the edges. Currently the variation is about 50 degrees. From 450 farenhite to 500 farenhite (measured via an instant read thermometer)

I just want to know if this is due to manufacturer fault or is such inconsistency common for gas griddles? Would such variation always exist in gas griddles?

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 4

The only griddle that comes any-where near to being even across the entire surface is the accu-temp griddle.

 

It uses a sealed steam chamber to heat the griddle from the underside.

 

Even using this technology (only one I know of) they still only claim +/- 3F for accuracy.

That is way way way better than anyone else out there which will commonly say that 50F is 'good enough' and in reality it commonly is.

 

The top is stainless steel however - so be prepared to use lots of non-stick spray or oil on foods that have low fat content as it doesn't really develop a patina. (season)

 

They can be polished quite easily however and then they become pretty slick but you have to be careful with the surface ... no banging of spatula's or turners etc.

 

http://www.accutemp.net/accu-steam_main.htm

 

One cool side benifit from the steam heating the steel surface is that the temp recovery is incredibly fast.  Seriously fast... I burnt quite a few things before I figured that one out.  (should have read the manual as it does talk about this!)

 

Basically when you put food down the temp of the steel drops causing condensation inside the 'sealed chamber' this condensation drips back into the bottom and is replaced by 'hot-steam' and the cycle repeats, very fast.

 

I call it a 'quick-griddle' as even set to 350 it cooks things quite a bit faster than normal cast-iron griddle - think of it as a 'convection-griddle' and treat it like a convection oven.  Set 25 degrees lower or learn to utilise the heat recovery.

 

You can actually flip burgers etc. onto the same spot they started and not see any real difference in browning speed.

 

I like them... wish my current place had one!  (hint hint)

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 

Ah thanks for the detailed reply Micheal. That machine does seem like it would come in handy at my place .. we only do grilled beef burgers and often end up with complaints of raw beef patties.
 

I was just wondering, do you know how places like Shake shack and five guys time their patties? When exactly do they know that the patties have been cooked thoroughly? Do they time it or is it left to the judgement of the guy handling the grill (based on colour change). This i would find a bit strange for a franchise...

post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxi View Post

Ah thanks for the detailed reply Micheal. That machine does seem like it would come in handy at my place .. we only do grilled beef burgers and often end up with complaints of raw beef patties.
 

I was just wondering, do you know how places like Shake shack and five guys time their patties? When exactly do they know that the patties have been cooked thoroughly? Do they time it or is it left to the judgement of the guy handling the grill (based on colour change). This i would find a bit strange for a franchise...

Some chains rely on timers - as the product comes pre-formed and is incredibly consistant and held at precise reliable temps. ie. cooked from frozen in clam-shell cooker etc. other chains just re-warm them as they come pre-cooked.

 

In most places it is up to the guy / girl manning the grill to determine if they are done.

 

A few ways I've seen them checked.

 

- make a small incision in the middle and check color

- use a thermometer designed for burgers / flat food

- grab the burger with the tongs near the middle and try to give it a fold on the griddle, depending on doneness the meat will bend / slightly crack / crumble or break in half (over done)

- poke it with the tongs and judge by resistance (like a steak but it will be softer)

- squish it until no pink juices come out (seriously bad idea but i've seen it)

- cook it to death just to be safe (even worse idea, but i've seen it....)

 

There are probably a dozen other ways but you get the idea hopefully.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
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