or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › 10" x 4" pan for double layer cake?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

10" x 4" pan for double layer cake?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I'm planning on making a red velvet cake but I only have a small tabletop oven and one 10" x 4" dark metal pan.  My fear is that if I use it to make one layer then it won't cook all the way in the middle.  I can't divide because I only have one oven, and the recipe I was going to use wanted me to add a tsp. each of vinegar and baking soda so I don't think it would be possible to leave half the batter out while the other one cooks without affecting how it rises during cooking.  

 

Should I go ahead and try to bake it all in the one pan and just lower temp. and increase cooking time?  Should I just buy a smaller pan and find a different recipe and just cook them one at a time?  Any suggestions would be appreciated.

post #2 of 5

Did the cake turn out ok?

You didn't mention your baking skill level altho reading between the lines I assume you are not a pastry virgin...correct?

If you are just now learning and you still need help, answers to the following may help us help you  talker.gif

First the oven.

 

Is there a fan option?

 

Do you have an oven thermometer in there? (I realize you don't have lots of extra room, but temp is critical, esp for preheating)

 

How much actual baking room is in there? (measure to find out)

 

Is there a rack to set the cake pan on ?

 

About that pan...I was confused re the measurements (10 in length and 4 in width or 10 in round and 4 in deep)?

That may sound picky but pan size is right up there with oven specs.

 

My brother lives in a teeny apt and regularly bakes in his toaster oven and is almost always successful with small one layer cakes.

He told me the key to his success is to open the little door and cram the pan in as fast as he can.

If the pre-heated air drops more than 30-40 degrees ( need a thermometer for this!) he turns the temp up for about 30 seconds and then sets it back to required temp.

The reasoning behind this is that the leavening's need a blast of hot air at the get-go as this is what activates the baking powder and makes it start raising the batter.

 

I would check all the above before altering the written recipe.

Reasoning... it is key to make the recipe exactly as written (at least the first go round)

This will give you a baseline to start at and a point from which to add and subtract.

 

mimi

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thank you for your reply mimi!  I was afraid that I would get no response.  I'm a home cook so anything I bake I do from recipes.  I don't have a lot of technical knowledge.  I haven't made the cake yet because I was waiting for a reply and didn't want to throw away an underdone cake if it indeed ended up turning out badly.  

 

As for the oven: there is no fan option, no thermometer.  If I put the rack on the very bottom and flip it so that the raised area is now lower than the last slot, I get about 7" of clearance.  

 

The pan is 10" round and 4" deep. (it fits perfectly into the oven)  It was the bottom part of a set to make a tiered cake.

 

If I follow your brother's example (I'm probably guessing at the heat lost by opening since I don't have a thermometer) do you think I could do a one layer and cut it afterward?

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

Did the cake turn out ok?

You didn't mention your baking skill level altho reading between the lines I assume you are not a pastry virgin...correct?

If you are just now learning and you still need help, answers to the following may help us help you  talker.gif

First the oven.

 

Is there a fan option?

 

Do you have an oven thermometer in there? (I realize you don't have lots of extra room, but temp is critical, esp for preheating)

 

How much actual baking room is in there? (measure to find out)

 

Is there a rack to set the cake pan on ?

 

About that pan...I was confused re the measurements (10 in length and 4 in width or 10 in round and 4 in deep)?

That may sound picky but pan size is right up there with oven specs.

 

My brother lives in a teeny apt and regularly bakes in his toaster oven and is almost always successful with small one layer cakes.

He told me the key to his success is to open the little door and cram the pan in as fast as he can.

If the pre-heated air drops more than 30-40 degrees ( need a thermometer for this!) he turns the temp up for about 30 seconds and then sets it back to required temp.

The reasoning behind this is that the leavening's need a blast of hot air at the get-go as this is what activates the baking powder and makes it start raising the batter.

 

I would check all the above before altering the written recipe.

Reasoning... it is key to make the recipe exactly as written (at least the first go round)

This will give you a baseline to start at and a point from which to add and subtract.

 

mimi

post #4 of 5

We will never know until we try....

Room temp batter, only fill the pan 2 inches deep (this is a large pan so make the full batch of batter as you will probably fit all of it in the pan)

Preheat the oven to 350 and have the filled pan as close to the center as possible.

I am banking on a 25 degree heat loss when you open and close the door.

Reset the oven temp to 325 and bake (I have no clue on the time maybe someone will pitch in here)????

If you had a 2 in pan I could say something like until the cake rises to top of pan and you then jiggle the oven and see if it is done.....bounce.gif

You are going to have to open that door and test with a light touch or a bamboo skewer.

Try to be fast and write down everything you do including the times.

If you are blessed by the kitchen witch (no kitchen witch? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchen_witch ) this first try will be successful.

If not.....here are some pro instructions.....http://mantestedrecipes.com/recipes/searchresults.aspx?text=cake%20toaster%20oven  well not really pro but has some cake recipes for small ovens and most actually make sense.

 

Like baking times and degrees and cover pan with foil (you might want to try the foil thing from the get go)....

 

mimi


Edited by flipflopgirl - 6/11/13 at 7:36am
post #5 of 5

Oh!

Forgot to mention... if your oven has a timer be sure to set it for more time than you really need and then time the baking by a clock or something.

Reasoning...don't want to be folding clothes or watching Game of Thrones and not hear the timer and the oven gets cold.

 

mimi

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › 10" x 4" pan for double layer cake?