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More alcohol remains after cooking than people think

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
More alcohol remains after cooking than people think
 
When people say "the alcohol will burn off in cooking.", all of it doesn't.
.
USDA Table of Nutrient Retention Factors, Release 6 (2007)
document located at:
www. ars. usda. gov/ SP2UserFiles/ Place/ 12354500/ Data/ retn/ retn06.pdf
(document Page 12 - PDF page 14).
.
Preparation Method Percent of Alcohol Retained
.
alcohol added to boiling liquid & removed from heat 85%
alcohol flamed 75%
no heat, stored overnight 70%
baked, 25 minutes, alcohol not stirred into mixture 45%
.
baked/simmered, alcohol stirred into mixture:
15 minutes 40%
30 minutes 35%
1 hour 25%
1.5 hours 20%
2 hours 10%
2.5 hours 5%
.
From the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, April, 2002, by Eleese Cunningham:
.
"The extent of loss depends on the severity of the heat application, or any other factor favoring evaporation. Cooking time had the greatest impact on alcohol retention. Flaming a dish results in much smaller losses of alcohol than cooking. Uncooked and briefly cooked dishes had the highest alcohol retention. Alcohol retention during cooking was also greatly affected by the size of the cooking vessel used. The smaller the cooking utensil the greater the amount alcohol retained. This was likely due to the smaller surface area for evaporation...."
post #2 of 3

interesting. I would have thought flaming would be 100%.

 

Welcome to the forum btw Antelope. 

"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #3 of 3

WOW! I am very surprised at this.  That is why I love this site!

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